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Articles by Sections parktimes Thu, 08/19/2010 - 17:20

Sections of Six Flags Over Texas

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Parkwide Articles parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 10:03

Parkwide Articles

1961 Photographs

1961 Photographs
Section
Parkwide
parktimes Fri, 08/20/2010 - 23:31

1961 Aerial Pictures

1961 Aerial Photographs

1961 Aerial Views

Aerial Photographs from the Opening Year of Six Flags
Click on each Thumbnail Images to View the Larger Graphic

Front Gate

View of Park looking West

Modern - USA Section

Modern - USA Section

Indian Village

Photos from the Fort Worth Star-Telegram Photograph Collection
Special Collections Division
The University of Texas at Arlington Libraries

Last Update: March 8, 2008

1961 Front Gate Photo

1961 Front Gate Photo
Section
Frontgate
parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 09:08

 

 

Front Gate View - 1961   -   Dancing Waters - Picture Middle

Petting Zoo, lower right corner -  Amphitheater, mid-right side

Fort Worth Star-Telegram Photograph Collection
Special Collections Division
The University of Texas at Arlington Libraries

Last Update: March 8, 2008

1961 USA Section

1961 USA Section parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 09:11

Modern Looking West

 

 Modern USA View Looking West - 1961   |   Happy Motoring - Middle Bottom

River ride - right side   |  Sidewinder Roller Coaster - Left

Fort Worth Star-Telegram Photograph Collection
Special Collections Division
The University of Texas at Arlington Libraries

Last Update: March 8, 2008

1961 Modern II

1961 Modern II parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 09:56

Modern Looking West

Modern USA Section: Looking West - 1961

Petting Zoo - Lower Left side - Frontgate - Upper Left Side

River ride - right side - Amphitheater Mid Right side

Fort Worth Star-Telegram Photograph Collection
Special Collections Division
The University of Texas at Arlington Libraries

Last Update: March 8, 2008

1961 Modern III

1961 Modern III parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 09:59

Modern Looking West

Modern USA Section View Looking West - 1961

Sidewinder Roller Coaster Lower Left  -  Astrolift Mid Right

Happy Motoring Lower Middle to Lower left Corner

 

Fort Worth Star-Telegram Photograph Collection
Special Collections Division
The University of Texas at Arlington Libraries

Last Update: March 8, 2008

1961 Indian Village

1961 Indian Village parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 10:01

Indian Village Aerial Photographs

 

Indian Village - 1961    -  Fiesta Train on siding in lower right corner

Texas Section top of picture

Fort Worth Star-Telegram Photograph Collection
Special Collections Division
The University of Texas at Arlington Libraries

 

Last Update: March 8, 2008

Origin of the Flags

Origin of the Flags
Section
Parkwide
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 20:04

The Origin of the "Six Flags"

    Six Flags Over Texas, the original Six Flags Park, and now the namesake of the entire Six Flags Amusement Park chain, takes its names from the six national flags which have flow over the area which is now the State of Texas.

    These are:

The United States Flag

The United States flag has flown over Texas from 1845 to 1861, then again from 1866 to the present.

The Texas Flag

The Texas state flag once flew over Texas as its national flag when Texas was an independent country from 1836 to 1845, after winning independence from Mexico, but before joining the United States.

The Confederate Flag

Between 1861 and 1865, the Confederate flag flew over Texas, as it was a state in the Confederate States of America.

The Mexican Flag

Texas was part of the Republic of Mexico from 1821 to 1836, after Mexico won independence from Spain.

The French Flag

Between 1685 to 1690 France maintained a colony in Texas, and the French flag flew over the state.

 

The Spanish Flag

The Spanish flag flew over Texas for three centuries, between 1519 and 1821, after Spanish explorers claims Texas in the name of their king.

Last Update: March 8 2008

Related Lists

Six Flags Timeline

Six Flags Timeline
Section
Parkwide
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 13:27

Six Flags over Texas Timeline

 

  Six Flags over Texas Timeline  
Date Event Location
1897
The Red Train, known as the Maribeau B. Lamar, and later as the Charles Patton, is manufactured by Porter Locomotives.
 
1901
The Green Train, known as the Sam Houston, and later as the Larry Cochran, is manufactured by Dickson  Locomotives.
 
1925/6 The Carrousel Ride is produced by the Dentzel Carousel Company of Philadelphia.  
1955 Disneyland Opens  
1959 Preliminary Planning for Six Flags Begins, by the Great Southwest Corp., real estate developer Angus Wynne of Dallas and New York Investors, owners  
August 1960 Construction for Six Flags Begins  
1961 Park Opening  
August 1, 1961 to August 5, 1961
  • "Soft test opening" of Six Flags
 
August 5, 1961
  • Grand Opening
  • Attendance: 8,374
 
1961 Season
  • Ticket Price: $2.75 adult; $2.25 child;
  •  Parking: 50c
  • Hamburger: 35c; Soft Drink: 10c
  • Minimum Employee age: 21
 
 
Dancing Waters
Star Mall
Marching Band
Front Gate
 
Southwest Life Petting Zoo
Missile Chaser
Happy Motoring Freeway
(One Track)
Astro-Lift
Sidewinder - Wild Mouse Roller Coaster
Modern
 
La Salle's Riverboat Adventure
France
 
Amphitheater (now the site of Southern Palace)
Butterfield Stage Coach (que house besides Nalar's Chicken Plantation.)
Little Dixie Carousal (later known as the "Flying Jenny") in front of Southern Palace.
Confederate recruiting station and re-enactment performers
Dixieland Band
Confederacy
 
Skull Island
"Skull Rock" skull slide
Raft Ride to Skull Island
Tree Slide
Confederacy
Skull Island
 
Six Flags Railroad
Astrolift Terminal
Gunfighter Performances
Texas
 
Los Conquistadors Coronado Burro Ride
Spain
 
Las Cocheses Cabras Goat Cart Ride
Indian Village, Indian Dancers
Original  Ferrocarril Fiesta Train
Mexican Band
Banderas de Colores (Covered walkway)
Mexico
 
  • Helicopter Rides
Outside the park
End 1961
  • 1st Season: 45 days
  • 1st Season Attendance: @550,000
  • Last day: November 25, 1961
 
     
1962 Season
  • Tickets: Adults $2.75,
  • under 12 $2.25
  • Minimum Employee Age: 18
  • Open: April 20, 1962
  • 1000 employees
 
 
Sidewinder roller coaster moved to Mexico renamed "La Cucaracha"
Mexico
 
Red Train Finished and on-line July 5, 1962
Chaparral Cars Added
Texas
 
Canoes added. (the path to Canoes Q-house next to Amphitheater)
 
 
Skull Island Expanded:
Tree House Slide Added
Barrel Slide Added
Pirate Ship & Cave play area
Skull Island
 
Second Happy Motoring Freeway added at site the Sidewinder
Modern
 
Casa Magnetica added
Spain
End of 1962
Burro Ride Removed
Spain
  Attendance: @1.2 million  
     
1963 Season Adults: $3.50, Under 12 $2.50  
 
BoomTown added
Antique Carousel Added
Sky-Hook Added
Boomtown Station RR Depot
Small Puppet Show Wagon
Boomtown
 
Happy Motoring Freeway First track shortened to make way for boomtown.
 
 
El Aserradero Flume I, Log Ride Added at site of Burro Ride
Spain
End of 1963 Season
  • Park Helicopter Rides Ended
 
 
Goat Cart Ride Removed
Mexico
     
1964 Season
Spee-Lunker's Cave Ride Added
Stagecoach run shortened and Q-house moved from next to Chicken Plantation to across from Cave.
Confederacy
 
Long Suspension Bridge Added
Swamp Tree Slides (3) added 
Skull Island
 
Caddo War Canoes Moved to Boomtown
Boomtown
End 1964
Indian Village Removed
"La Cucaracha", Wild Mouse Rollercoaster Removed
Mexico
 
Pirate Boat Removed
Skull Island
     
1965 Season
Arena added
Circus Show in Arena
Texas
 
El Sombrero Hat Ride added at site of "La Cucaracha" rollercoaster
Mexico
end 1965
Circus Show ends at New Arena
 
  "Star" removed from Front-Gate and Replaced with five large circular planters. Front Gate
     
1966 Season
Wild West Show in Arena
Texas
 
Runaway Mine Train added
Boomtown
  Courthouse Clock-Tower (Ice House) added at Front Gate Front Gate
     
1967 Season  
 
Jet Set added
Modern
End 1967 Season
Butterfield Stagecoach removed
Confederacy
 
Original Fiesta Train (The Mexican Hat Train) removed.
 
  Attendance: @ 2 million  
     
1968 Season
Fiesta Train II
(replaced original Fiesta Train)
Mexico
  Spindletop moved to between Southern Palace and Skull island  
 
Amphitheater converted to 950 seat Southern Palace theater
Confederacy
 
Flume II added
Spain
 
Sid and Marty Kroft Puppet Theater added
Outside Modern
End 1968 Season
Sky-Hook removed
Boom-town
 
Long Suspension Bridge removed
Swamp Tree Slides (3) removed 
Skull Island
     
  Attendance: 1.7 Million;
First Attendance Decline
 
     
1969 Angus Wynne sells Six Flags (205 acres) to Limited Partnership headed by Jack Knox.  
1969 Season
Tower added
Tower Slide added
Dolphin show added
Tower
 
Mini Mine Train added at the site of the SkyHook
Boomtown
 
Chevy show added at the Site of the Stagecoach ride.
Confederacy
End of 1969
Wild West Show ended
Arena
     
1970's
1970
Arena remodeled
Las Voladores Flying Indian Spectacular in Arena
Arena
End 1970 Season
Jet Set removed
Modern
     
1971 Six Flags Over Mid-America (St Louis) Opens  
1971 Season Penn Central Railroad begins management of Six Flags Over Texas  
1971
Big Bend Rollercoaster Added
Modern
     
1972
Rugged Buggy Added in Petting Zoo
Modern
 
@Texas Travel Exhibit with Scale Model of Six Flags Park opens.
Boomtown
End 1972
Boomtown RR Depot Removed
 
     
1973 Season
Good Time Square added
Doc Snooker's Infernal Electric Bumping Machines (Bumper Cars) added
Crazy Legs added
Miniature Circus Exhibit added
GTS RR Depot Added
Small Theater added next to Puppet show (Will Rogers Show)
Good Times Square
May 19, 1973 Attendance Record: 40,742  
     
1974 Season Music Mill added (4,500 seats) Music Mill
End of 1974 season
Arena closed
Flying Indian Spectacular closed
Texas
 
Flying Jenny removed
Confederacy
     
1975 Six Flags, Inc., buys Astroworld  
1975 Season Open: March 15, 1975
Closed: November 30, 1975
Tickets: $7; Under 12 $6; under 3 free
 
  Cyrus Comos, the inventor, introduced as new mascot, his Incredible Electric Light Brigade Parade Featured.  
 
Red Baron added (replaced the Flying Jenny); (Cyrus Comos Invention)
Confederacy
 
Rotoriculous (later Roto Disco) added; (Cyrus Comos Invention)
Small Theater show changed from Will Rogers to The Fun Guns of Dry Gulch
Good Times Square
End 1975
Small Theater removed - (The Fun Guns of Dry Gulch)
Sid & Marty Kraft show removed from Puppet show.
 
 
  • 27 million guests to date
  • Average Daily Attendance: 15,000
 
     
1976 Season
  • Open: March 13, 1976
  • Close: Nov. 28, 1976
  • Tickets: $7.50; Under 3 free; Season Pass $25.00
 
 
Texas Chute Out added
Good Times Square
End 1976 season
Skull Island Rafts removed
 
 
Slide removed
 
     
1977 Six Flags Inc., buys Great Adventure and Wild Safari Animal Park, Jackson, N.J.  
1977 Season
Spinnaker added
Tower Area
 
Stand up Baskets added to Chute Out
Good Times Square
 
Pirate Puppet Show added
Skull Island
July 3, 1977 Record Breaking Crowd - 45,496
K.C. and the Sunshine Band Concert
 
End 1977 season
Missile Chaser removed
Modern
     
1978 Season Tickets: $8.50; Under 3 free
32 Million Guests to date
 
 
ShockWave added
North of Park
End 1978 Season
Skull removed from Skull Island
Skull Island Confederacy
 
Fiesta Train II removed
Mexico
  Record Attendance: 2.78 Million  
  Average Yearly Attendance: 2.5 million  
     
1979 Season
Sensational Sense Machine added at site of Missile Chaser
Modern
 
People Mover Machine Added
 
  Six Flags Inc., buys Magic Mountain  
End 1979
Big Bend removed
Modern, Texas
 
Banderas de Colores (Covered walkway) Removed
 
  Angus Wynne passed away at the age of 65.  
     
1980s
1980 Season
Judge Roy Scream added
South of Park
August 5, 1980 Twentieth Anniversary
2.7 Million Annual visitors (est.)
 
 
Happy Motoring I Removed
(Happy II becomes Happy)
Modern
End 1980 Season
@Crazy Legs removed
Miniature Circus Exhibit removed
Good Time Square
 
Astro-Lift removed
 
     
1981 Season
Conquistador added
Mexico
 
Kiddie Ferris Wheel added by Tower
Tower
     
1982 Penn Central Sells Six Flags Corp., which manages the park to Bally Manufacturing Corporation.  
1982 Season
Texas Cliffhanger added
Modern
August 15, 1982
La Salle River Adventure Removed
Last ride August 15, 1982
France
End of 1982
Petting Zoo removed
Modern
 
Spindetop Moved to Texas, site of Texas Lift
 
 
Last of Skull Island Removed
Pirate Puppet Show removed
Skull Island
     
1983 Season
Roaring Rapids added
Tower
 
Pac-man Land Opened (site of Zoo)
"Soft-play" playground added
Red Baron moved to Pac-man land
Ferris Wheel moved to Pac-man land
(Rugged Buggy from Zoo becomes part of Pac-man land.)
Modern
 
Texas Tornado added at site of Crazy Legs
Good Times Square
 
People Mover Machine changed to Pac Man Show
 
End 1983 Season
Canoes removed
BoomTown
 
Dolphins removed
Tower
     
1984 Six Flags Inc, buys Great America in Chicago  
1984 Season
Great Air Racer added
US High Diving Show added (at Dolphin pool)
Tower
 
Spindletop Moved to Texas
Texas
  First "Spring Break Out"  
end 1984 Season
Pac-Man Land removed
Modern
  Attendance: @2.35 million  
     
1985 Season
  • Tickets: $14.95, under 42": $7.95
 
 
Looney Tunes Land added
Daffy Duck Boats added
Red Baron renamed to Tazmanian Devil Flying Ace
Rugged Buggy renamed to Road Runner Runaround
Modern
Christmas 1985 "Holiday in the Park" Introduced; 100,000 Guests  
End 1985
Merry Go Round removed for rebuilding
Boomtown
 
US High Diving Show ends
 
  Attendance: Over 2.5 million  
     
1986 Season Tickets: $14.95, under 42": $7.95  
 
Avalanche BobSled Ride Added
Mexico
 
Dolphins Back in Dolphin Pool
 
  Music Mill expanded to 10,000 seats  
August 5, 1986 25th Anniversary -
52 Million Guest to date (est.)
 
End 1986 Season
Happy Motoring Freeway removed
Modern
     
1987 Wesray Capital Corp. buys Six Flags Corp., the parks management co. for $617 million.  
1987 Season
Splashwater Falls added at site of Happy Motoring
Modern
  Incredible Acrobats of China perform during the summer.  
End 1987    
     
1988 Season
Merry Go Round reopened at the Front Gate as the Silver Star Carousel.
Front Gate
 
Gun Fighter Stunt Show added at site of Dolphin show
Tower
Oct. 22, 1988 Third Largest Crowd - Fright Night - 45,000  
End 1988 Season
Rotoriculous Removed
Good Times Square
 
Stunt Show Closed
Tower
     
1989 Season Open: March 4th, 1990
Close: December 31st, 1990
Tickets: $20.50; Children/Seniors $14 (after tax)
 
 
Flashback Roller Coaster Added
Good Times Square
 
Texas Tornado Swing Ride moved to old site of Merry Go Ride
Boomtown
 
Dolphin Show Starts Second Run
Tower
End 1989
Spindletop Removed
 
     
1990s
1990 Season Open: March 17, 1990
Close: December 31st, 1990
 
 
Texas Giant Roller Coaster Added
Texas
  Over 3 Million Visitors, record season  
     
1991 Time Warner Corp. buys one-half of the Six Flags Corp., which manages the park for the ownership that owns it. The Blackstone Group and Wertheim Schroder  buy the second one-half.  
End 1991 Season Spee-lunkers evicted from Cave Confederacy
     
1992 season Yosemite Sam and Gold River added (rethemed cave ride) Confederacy
  Batman Stunt Show added at site of old Stunt Show (site of older Dolphin Show) Tower
     
1993 Tickets: $25.95; $19.95 kids/seniors  
1993 Timer Warner Buys the second one-half of the Six Flags Corp., which manages the park.  
     
1994 Tickets: $26.95; $20.95 kids
2,500 Seasonal Employees
225 Full time workers
 
     
1995 season Right Stuff simulator added  
  Cliffhanger Name Changed to G-Force  
  Splash Down Falls Name Changed Modern
  Chameleon Virtual Reality added. Good Times Square
  Music Mill size doubled to over 10,000 seats.  
End 1995 season Spinnaker Removed  
1996 Season Runaway Mountain Opens Confederacy
  Runaway Mine Train named changed to Mine Train Boomtown
  Dive Bomber Alley opens Tower
End 1996 season Good Times Square Train station removed Good Times Square
     
1997 Season New Boomtown RR Station opens Boomtown
End 1997 Elmer Fudd Little Ferris Wheel Removed  
     
1998 Premier Parks buys both the Six Flags Corporation which manages the park and the park itself.  
1998 Season Mr. Freeze Roller-coaster Opens Good Times Square
  Rebuilt Mini-mine train opens  
End 1998 Right Stuff Movie and theming removed.  
     
1999 Season Gotham City Section Opens  
  BatMan the Ride Opens Good Time Square
  Right Stuff Theater rethemed to Dinosaur exhibit Modern
  Pay as you go Go-Carts added by Shockwave Tower
End 1999 Air Racer Removed Tower
2000s
2000 Season Missile-Chaser Returns to Tower Area Tower
2001 Season

The Titan Roller Coaster Added

 

  Wyle E. Coyote's Grand Canyon Blaster Modern - Looney Tunes Land

2002

Space Shuttle America in 3d Theater

Modern Section

End of 2002 New Missilechaser removed at end of season Tower Section

2003

Superman Tower of Power added at sight of Missilechaser and Great Air Racer

Tower Section
  Right Stuff Returns to 3d Theather Modern

2004

Sponge Bob Added to 3d Theater

Modern

  Casa Magnetica Returns Spain

2005

New shows: - Chinese Acrobats, Spirit of Dance and Kathy Burk's World of Puppets

45th Season

     
2006 1)   Acme Rock-n-Rocket built in Modern section Modern
Ten new rides added parkwide for 45th Anniversary 2)   Cloud Bouncer added in Good  Times Square
3)   Crazy Legs added in Good Times Square (Different ride from previous ride with the same name.)
Good Times Square
  4)  Bat Wings added in Gotham City
5)  Gotham City Sprayground addin in Gotham City
Gotham City
  6) Caddo lake Barge added to Tower Section Tower Section
  7)  Rodeo Ride added next to Texas Section by the Cave
8)  Sidewinder scramble style ride added next to the titan (Different ride from previous ride with the same name.)
9)   Boot Scottin'
Texas Section
  10)  La Fiesta De Las Tazas tea cup style ride added at location of El Sombero. El Somberro  (Hat Ride) moved close to front gate. Mexico and Spain

2007

Cirque Dreams Coobrila added at Music Mill Theater

Tower Section Music Mill Theater

2008

Tony Hawk's Big Spin Planned

 

2009

 

 

2010

 

 

50th Season

 

2011

 

Fifty Anniversary

 

Note of Appreciation:

      With special thanks to Scott Jordan for proof reading and historical information. Additional corrections by Tracy Henton and Sara Luckow.


     This Timeline attempts to list many of the notable events in the History of Six Flags Over Texas.

If you have any additions or corrections, please e-mail me using our contact form.

Davis McCown
Ride Operations, 1974-1977

Related Lists

Sissy's Story

Sissy's Story parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 20:32

Sissy's Story

 

The Story of Sis, The Six Flags Elephant

 

 

     When Six Flags first opened in 1961, one of the attractions was a petting zoo. The zoo was located in the USA section in the area where Looney Tunes Land is now located.

     One of the most notable attractions at the zoo was Sis the Six Flags Elephant (Sissy).  In fact, there were several "Sis" Elephants.  Due to the rate at which the young elephants grow, each "baby" elephant was replaced after one or two seasons.  This article concerns Sis VI, the sixth Elephant to live in the Six Flags Petting Zoo.  Sis has had a most exciting, although not always happy, live.

    The elephants in the pictures to the right are actually earlier Sis elephants. One is SIS II. Sis I was in the park from 1961 through 1963. The first SIS is shown in two of the shots to the right.

BACKGROUND

     Sis is an Asian Elephant, from Bangkok, Thailand.  She came to Six Flags in April of 1969. At that time, she was five months old, 34 inches high and weighed 160 pounds. Her exact birthday is unknown, so it has been sat at December 1, 1968.

     Sis apparently was removed from her Elephant family too soon, and as a result, did not properly develop socialization skills necessary to interact with other elephants.

SIX FLAGS

    Sis was officially named "Sis Flagg" by the park, as a play on the name Six Flags. She was a regular feature in the petting zoo as shown by the shots on the right of earlier Sis elephants. 

 

The Story of Sis

I Believe that this is Young Sis II
This is the Elephant in the Article

Sis I at the Petting Zoo, early 60s.
This is the First SIS and not the SIS in the Article.

Sis I at the Petting Zoo, early 60s.
This is also the First SIS and not the SIS in the Article.
Larry  Thomas is on the right
.

Her life in the park was essentially uneventful. Other than the occasional complaint that she stepped on someone's foot, or push someone into the rail, she got along well.     

Eventually, however, she became too large to keep as a petting Zoo animal. She left the Six Flags amusement park in November of 1969.    

     There were more Sis Elephants after Sis VI.  In particular, there was one that died in the park in about 1975. That may have been the last elephant Six Flag's had, as the park stopped keeping elephants in the mid 1970's. The Petting Zoo was closed after the 1982 season and converted into the Children's ride area. It is now Looney Tunes land.       

      In any case, Sis was sold to the Frank Buck Zoo in Gainesville, Texas in November of 1969. The school children of Gainesville collected pennies to buy the elephant. The children raised $3,900.00. The park sold the elephant for her purchase price of $3,400.00, so the Zoo had $400 left over for the care of Sis.

     She was very popular at the Zoo.  She was called Gerry II at Gainesville, because she replaced an elephant that died and was known as Gerry.  She was a favorite attraction at the Zoo.

THE FLOOD of 1981

     The Zoo was, however, built in a flood plain. In 1981, it flooded and Sis was literally submerged. She had to stick her trunk up in the air and wrap it around a tree limb just to breath. She was trapped in the flood waters for over a day.  

     Such suffered trauma as a result of the storm and still has problems dealing with storms and being washed. 

THE FORT WORTH ZOO 1986-1988

     In 1986 she was sent to the Fort Worth Zoo at the age of 24. This was the first time that she had been with other elephants. She did not adjust well to the unfamiliar surroundings and was not equipped to deal with the other elephants. After a very unhappy two years, she returned to Gainsville.

THE GAINSVILLE INCIDENT MAY 1997

     She went back to Gainsville, which was essentially her life long home.  But after she returned to Gainsville, a Zoo Keeper was killed in Sis's enclosure. Although it is not know what happened, Sis became known as a killer and Gainsville wanted to be rid of her.

THE HOUSTON ZOO APRIL 1998

     In April of 1998, Sis went to the Houston Zoo where she could again be with other Elephants at a top rate facility.  She still could not socialize well with other and was suffering depression from her various traumas.

THE EL PASO ZOO NOVEMBER 1998

     The Houston Zoo was just a temporary stopping point while arrangements were made for her new home at the El Paso Zoo. She was sent to the El Paso Zoo before her new home was completely made ready.

MISTREATMENT

     Her arrival at the El Paso was videotaped. She was treated so badly by Zoo Keepers when she arrived that the City Council voted to remove her from the Zoo.

     Those that have viewed the videotape described it as a "savage beating." She was struck on her legs with bats and ax handles. The beating lasted several hours.

    She was not received well by the other elephants either, and one knocked her over at least twice. A crane had to be used to stand her back up. 

     As a result of her beating, the US Department of Agriculture charged the Zoo with violations of the Federal Animal Welfare Act. In addition, the Zoo Director resigned. 

     While at El Paso, she suffered a partially paralyzed trunk as well.

THE ELEPHANT SANCTUARY 2000

     As of January 26th, 2000, Sis is at The Elephant Sanctuary in Hohenwald, Tennessee. Upon her arrival, she was in poor health, did not eat or sleep well and suffers emotional trauma. She is now, however, doing very well, although she may have to undergo tooth surgery.  She is even learning to get along with the other elephants.

     The Elephant Sanctuary bills itself as the "first natural habitat refuge developed specifically for endangered Asian elephants." It operates on 800 acres near Nashville.

     Hopefully, she can spend the rest of her days at the Sanctuary in peace. Normally, her lifespan in the wild would be nearly 70s years. She is now forty-two. 

 

     Read more about Sis at  Sissy's Page at the Elephant Sanctuary.

     Donations for her support can be made at: Sissy's Support page.

 

last update: March 8, 2008

Marching Band

Marching Band
Section
Parkwide
parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 11:06

Six Flags Marching Band
by Mark Finley, Six Flags Band, 1985 & 86

[Click on Pictures for Larger Views]

     In 1985, Six Flags brought back a feature that had /sections/parkwide/liveshows/mfband1.jpg (30565 bytes)been missing from the park since the early days, a marching band. This generation of musicians would be very different from the military style of the early 60’s. This band would be made up of the most talented, energetic young players in the Metroplex, and they would play all styles of music including funk, jazz, popular music with a big band feel, and yes, even the occasional march. Brought out the archives was the Six Flags Over Texas march, which had not been heard in over 20 years until resurrected by the new band.

     In 1985, the new band started the day by playing at the front gate, greeting the first visitors of the day with traditional marches. Every show after that was in various location in the park, including the base of the tower, (and sometimes the top of the tower) the modern section, and outside the Southern Palace. The latter location soon proved to be the spot the band became famous for, because the band timed their arrival in the area with the southern palace crowd exit. The crowds were enormous, and it was not unusual to see people climbing trees to get a better view of the high-energy show. A typical show would include extended jazz solos, synchronized dancing, and sometimes a romantic ballad played to members of the crowd.

/sections/parkwide/liveshows/mfband2.jpg (42150 bytes)     1986 brought the 25th anniversary of the park, and a nighttime parade that wound from Good Times Square to the Texas section. The Band followed the parade with a closing set outside the Texas train depot. The Band also appeared in, and recorded the soundtrack for a Television commercial, was featured on the morning show of a local FM radio station, and won first prize for a musical group in the Arlington Fourth of July Parade.

     Starting in 1987, Six flags contracted out the on-grounds entertainment to a lessee. Older professionals from the area replaced the younger musicians, which changed the energy and appeal of the group. By 1990, the marching band program had been cancelled altogether.

mfband3.jpg (43481 bytes)

Play the Six Flags March

Click here to hear the band playing "Birdland"

Last update: Wednesday, July 04, 2007

Holiday in the Park

Holiday in the Park parktimes Fri, 08/20/2010 - 22:57

tastar1_small.jpg (3606 bytes)   

[Click on the pictures for larger views]

    Holiday in the Park is a holiday season attraction which typically runs from the Day after Thanksgiving to new Year's Eve. The park is converted into a Christmas town, with lights, carolers and attractions. The first "Holiday in the Park" was in 1985 and it has run each year since.

 

 hipsnow1.jpg (33293 bytes)

    Holiday in the park features vary from year to year, but in the past have included:

  • decorating the trees and buildings with holiday lights;
  • changing the shows to holiday seasonal shows;
  • stringing holiday lights on the Chute-Out, converting it into a Giant Christmas Tree;
  • placing a large star on two sides of the top of the tower;
  • opening a "snow hill" for sledding;
  • Christmas Carolers singing at various locations around the park;
  • a Lunny-tunes show at the front gate.
  • In early years, horse carriages took riders through the park. These have been abounded.

gtscho3.jpg (25004 bytes)    The first year, only a few rides were open. In the recent years, however, many of the rides and attractions have been open. Typically closed are the water rides, which are too cold to enjoy; the Tower and Chute-out, which are closed due to the decorations; and some of the roller-coasters on the outer edges of the park.

    In addition to the decoration and attractions, the stores sell holiday items.

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(c) Davis McCown
Last Update: July 04, 2007

Related Lists

Ten Oldest Rides

Ten Oldest Rides parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 20:16

The Ten Oldest Rides

    The Ten Oldest Rides still operating in the park are as listed. Each is profiled with an article at this site. The list also corresponds with all of the rides built in the 60s which are still operational in the park.

1.   The Six Flags Railroad - Opened 1961;

2.   Chaparral Cars - Opened 1962;

3.   The Flume Ride - opened 1963;

4.   The Silver Star Carrousel - opened 1963 (closed 1986 & 1987 for remodeling);

5.   The Cave Ride - open 1964; rethemed 1992;

6.   El Sombrero - opened 1965;

7.   Runaway Mine Train - opened 1966;

8.   Tower - open 1969; closed for renovations 1998
      Mini-Mine Train - open 1969; closed for renovations & reconstruction 1997.

10) the Rugged Buggy, now a Loony Tunes land ride was added in 1972, in the petting zoo.

The Rugged Buggy is the park's oldest "kiddie ride".

    The next major ride to be added, which is still in the park, is the Texas Chute-out, added in 1976. The Red Baron, also now a Loony Tunes land ride, was also added in 1975.

      The next major ride to still be operating in the park is the Shockwave, which opened in 1978. 

NOTES:

    The Flume is considered older than the Carrousel, as the Carousel was closed for two full seasons.

    The Tower and Mini-mine Train are considered tied for 9th oldest, as both have been closed for a season.

(c) Davis McCown
Last Update: August 17, 2010

45th Anniversary Additions

45th Anniversary Additions parktimes Fri, 08/20/2010 - 23:04

Ten New Rides for 2006

     Six Flags over Texas is adding 10 new rides for 2006. This expansion will be the largest in park history. The ten new rides include:

    USA Section:

           1)    ACME Rock-n-Rocket - A ride similar to the Conquistador, only shaped like a firecracker rocket. In addition to the different shape, the Rock-n-Rocket swings you a round to a full 360 degrees. The ride is located next to the Ultimate Adventure Theater, which is currently showing Sponge-Bob Square-Pants.

   Goodtimes Square:

        2)      Cloud Bouncer - This is an up and down ride in which the riders sit in Hot air balloon Baskets. The balloons rise up into the air, go around in a circle and come down. The ride is located by the majestic theater (the Goodtimes Square Theater.)

       3)     Crazy Legs - A centrifugal force ride with 3 arms that go up and down and spin you around. This ride is located near the exit of the Flashback. This ride Is NOT the same Crazy legs that was added to the park in 1971. It is however basically the same ride, with just a little bit of differences. 

     Gotham City:

       4)    Bat wings A ride similar to the Dumbo ride in Disneyworld. The little Bat cars send you up and down and around and around. This ride is located by Mr. Freeze.

       5)    Gotham City Sprayground - This is basically a playground with water. It is located across from Batman the Ride.

        Tower Section:

     6)    Caddo Lake Barge -  Similar to the Conquistador, this ride slides you on a curved track instead of  swinging from a support. While it slides you back and forth, it also spins you around. This ride is located on the lake by the superman tower of power.

    Texas Section:

  7)    Rodeo - This ride is  similar to the teacup rides, only instead of tea cups you ride in bulls. While the bulls spin you in around they also buck you up and down. Hold on to you hat!!! This ride is located by the Cave Ride.

    8)    Sidewinder - A classic scrambler ride, the Sidewinder is similar to the Missile Chaser that was in the park. There was also a Scrambler Ride where the superman was. The ride was put in after the Park took down Air racer. It was a filler until they could figure out what to do with the space. They finally decided on the Superman. The new Sidewinder will be located by the Titan. The Sidewinder was also the name of the first roller coaster in the park.

    9)    Boot Scootin' -  This ride is a merry-go-round with boots. While you spin the boot gently jolt up and down. This ride is located directly across from the Chaparral Antique Cars. 

   Mexico and Spain:

    10)     La Fiesta De Las Tazas -  This ride is a basic teacup ride.  The name roughly translates to: The "Party of the Teacups (cups)".  This ride is located by the La Vibora Bobsled, where the Mexican hat used to be. The Mexican hat was moved in order to build this ride.  

   These descriptions are taken from the Press releases, computer generated photos and the video on the Six Flags website. The Cloud Bouncer and Batwings name were already changed from the initial press release. The original name was "Up, Up, and Away" for Cloud Bouncer. Batwings first name was "Blackbird".

 By: Katie McCown

Last Update: Wednesday, July 04, 2007

Frontgate Mall

Frontgate Mall
Section
Frontgate
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 14:05

The Front Gate

 

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    The Star Mall, the Six Flags and the Dancing Waters were the main components of the Front Gate for many years.

Related Lists

Star Carousel

Star Carousel
Section
Frontgate
Year installed
1963
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 21:21

     The Six Flags Silver Star Carousel opened with the opening of boomtown in 1963. It is tied with the Flume Ride as the fourth oldest attraction in the park, behind the Six Flags Railroad, the Chaparral cars, and Casa Magnetica (and excluding the Crazy Horse Saloon, which is a show). It actually has been open less years than the Log Flume, as it was out of service for three seasons.

DESCRIPTION

     The Silver Star is a Sixty-six (66) horse carousel located at the Frontgate of the park. There are four rows of horses, fifty jumpers and sixteen "standers". (Standers do not move up and down with the ride.) fgmgrhr2.jpg (43492 bytes)

     In addition to the horses, there are two double bench seat "chariots". The ride does not have menagerie animals.

     Neither the brass ring machine, nor the band organ operate and the organ has been removed.

BACKGROUND

     The Carousel is a Dentzel, meaning that it was manufactured by the Dentzel Carousel company of Philadelphia. Dentzel was started by Gustav Dentzel who manufactured his first carousel in 1867. He started the first manufacturing company in America which built carousels on a regular full time basis.

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       Carousel horses at the time were carved from wood by skilled wood carvers. They were each individually crafted. Some of the Six Flags horses actually predate the ride itself and were crafted in 1900.

     Gustav Dentzel passed away in 1909 and his son William Dentzel took over the family business. The Six Flags Carousel was manufactured around 1925 or 1926. The Dentzel company was sold to another major ride producer, Philadelphia Toboggan, in 1928.

     Some published articles state the Six Flags Carousel was the last Dentzel?s Carousel made. This is considered unconfirmed, since the company operated for at least two years after manufacturing this particular Carousel.

 

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ROCKAWAY PLAYLAND

     Prior to being purchased by Six Flags, the Carousel was at the Rockaway Playland on Long Island in New York. Rockaway had owned and operated it since it was bought new from Dentzel. Rockaway Playland closed in 1987.

     Six Flags bought the Carousel for approximately $25,000, in 1962, the year before it opened in the park.

BOOMTOWN

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     The Carousel was originally placed in the Boomtown section of the Park in the current location of the Texas Tornado Swing Ride. It was simply referred to as the "Merry-go-Round" in early park maps and publications.

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     The ride was removed from Boomtown in 1985 for restoration, with the hope that it would reopen for the park?s Twenty-fifth anniversary in 1986. The restoration, however, took two years longer than anticipated and the ride did not reopen until 1988.

     It took over 30,000 hours of labor to restore the Carousel. The horses were completely rebuilt, with new body parts being created as needed. A coating of fiberglass, and old layers of paint, were stripped off the animals before being repainted.

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     Two of the original horses are missing and have been replaced.

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FRONT GATE

    The ride reopened on a raised platform and under a protective roof at the park?s Frontgate. After reopening, the ride was renamed as the Silver Star Carousel.

    Located amidst the Park?s Six Flags, entrance to the ride is by a set of stairs which cross over the park's "dancing waters."

CURRENT STATE

fgmrgnew1.jpg (46552 bytes)     The ride is now valued at over Five million dollars, and the individual horses are worth between $50,000 and $100,000. Ten years after being restored, some of the Horses are again becoming cracked and looking their age.

     Although it is an impressive sight, the ride's placement at the Frontgate is inconvenient for children wanting to ride the horses. Traditionally, rides are not placed at the front gate of amusement parks due to the congestive nature of front gate areas. Front gate plazas are always crowed with people coming and going. Having a ride in the area only adds to the confusion.fgmgrpic.jpg (46528 bytes)

     This is particularly true of the Carousel, whose stairs now constitute the majority of seating in the front gate area. Children wanting to ride the ride have to negotiate their way through layers of guests sitting on the stairs waiting on their parties. They then have to negotiate their way down the same steps after exiting the ride.

    It is obviously too expensive and unwise to move the ride again. The Park should, however, explore the possibility of moving the entrance/exit to an area behind the Carousel. In this manner the ride would maintain the visual impact it has at the front gate, while at the same time, the congestion problems could be avoided.

OTHER TEXAS DENTZELS

     The Carousel at the State Fair grounds in Dallas is also a Dentzel, being manufactured around 1914. The Carousel at Astroworld is an even older Dentzel,  manufactured in 1907.

     During the early 1970's when the ride was in boomtown, the Railroad spiel stated that the ride was identical to the one at the Smithsonian Institute. In fact, prior to the bicentennial, the Smithsonian purchased a Dentzel Carousel, but was never able to restore it and make it operational. (Updated information provided by Anthony.)

Silver Star Horses

1 Dentzel17 Silver31 Casper 49 Denny

2 Snorty18 Den Keeper32 Galaxy50 White Gold

3 Pegasus19 Spot33 Grace51 Last Chance

5 Sound Wave21 Thunder35 Pale Rider53 Calypso

Fluffy the
Happy Dragon

36 Destiny54 Melon Ball

37 Clay Born55 Smokey

6 Patent Leather22 Rex38 Double Trouble56 Wild Rider

7 Desert Runner23 Jumper39 Breaker57 Lucky Star

8 Curley24 Scotty40 Cupid58 Nice Gem

9 Wild Runner25 Olympic41 Cyclone59 Jello

10 Spike26 Grand Runner42 Miss Anne60 Blue Boy

11 Sun Dancer27 Dark Start43 Distant Runner61 Do Right

12 Native Dancer28 Dasher44 Daisey62 Sleeper

Buttercup the
Happey Dragon

45 Feather63 Fighter

46 Blaze64 Midnight

14 Moon Rider29 Porky Pig47Sudden Motion65 Wind Rider

15 Cruncher30 Ghost48 Blondie66 Soul Crusher

16 Man a War   

  

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Modern USA

Modern USA parktimes Sat, 08/14/2010 - 14:41

USA - The Modern Section

The USA Section represents Texas under the US flag. It is often called the "Modern" section, because it represents the current and future Texas. The Original Attractions included The Petting Zoo, a small Zoo which housed various animals that the could be feed and petted. Included were small farm animals, such as goats and a donkey, as well as some exotic animals, such as a baby elephant and giant turtle.

Another original attraction was the AstroLift. The Astrolift was a cable car with four passenger gondolas which took riders from the Modern section to the Texas Section. Also included was Happy Motoring, in which guest drove two seat gas automobiles around a track.

The Sidewinder was the parks first roller coaster and the Misslechaser was a scrambler ride. Other Attractions: The Jet Set was an airplane ride. It was replaced by the Big Bend roller coaster, which was added in the seventies. Loony-Tunes Land The Cliffhanger Splash Water Falls 3d Theater Modern Food Courts.

Astrolift Ride

Astrolift Ride parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 10:19
Parksections
Modern
Year installed
1961
Final Season
1980

 

    The Astrolift was one of the original rides at the park's opening in 1961. The ride was a suspended cable car ride similar to rides at the Texas State fair, the San Antonio Zoo, and other amusement parks. The 25 cars provided guests a panoramic view of the park as they traveled up to 55 feet high.

    The 2,100 feet ride traveled across the park from the Modern section to the Texas section. The Modern station sat near where the 'Escape From Dino Island' theater is now.  The Texas Station was located near what is now the picture center for the Texas Giant. At various times the ride was two-way, allowing guests to return to their starting terminal, and one-way, requiring they exit and the opposite terminal.

    While the ride originally traveled across the park, by the time it was removed, expansion placed the Modern station more towards the middle of the park.

    Built by the Von Roll Co. of Berne, Switzerland, the ride cost $300,000.

 

 

    

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags

Happy Motoring Freeway

Happy Motoring Freeway
Section
Modern
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sat, 08/14/2010 - 22:15
Last Season Operated
1987

Happy Motoring

1961 - 1986

The Humble Happy Motoring Freeway (known as the "Modern Cars") opened with the Park in 1961.  The track ran along the South edge of the Modern Section from near the Zoo to the area that would become Boomtown.

The ride consisted of small go-cart sized vehicles with sport car bodies. Each of the twenty-two cars were powered with a 7½ horsepower rear gas engine. The gas pedal on the driver’s side actually moved the car forward, while the steering wheel controlled the direction of the cars travel.

The cars traveled around the track at six miles per hour, passing billboards and waiving by-passers. Just to make sure that there was no rush hour grid lock, the roadway contained a metal guide-strip directly in the middle. The guide-strip prevented the cars from leaving the track while still allowing the driver to steer the cars on the track.

The ride was favored by the younger crowd, because it allowed them to actually “drive” the car, controlling both the speed, and within limits, the direction of the car.

Eventually the body style of the cars changed in order to keep the appearance of the cars up to date with actual car styles and designs.

Due to the popularity of the ride, in 1962 a second Happy Motoring Freeway was added next to the first track. The queue house used by the Sidewinder Rollercoaster was converted into the queue house for the second happy ride.This increased the number of cares on the two tracks to 38. In order to make room for this second track, the Sidewinder roller coaster in turn was moved to the Mexican section.

Six Flags would operate with two Happy Motoring tracks until the end of the 1980 season. At that time, the original track was removed. The track added in 1962 continued to operate as the lone track until 1986, when it also was removed.

 

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Section

Missile Chaser

Missile Chaser parktimes Sat, 08/14/2010 - 23:09
Parksections
Modern
Year installed
1961
Final Season
1977

The Missilechaser was a scrambler type ride. It opened with the park in 1961 and was removed from the park at the end of the 1977 season. The area where it was located was later used for the Sensational Sense Machine
attraction. This area is no longer open to the public.

The ride was the first of three scrambler rides installed in the park. The second scrambler, also named the Missilechaser was added in 2000 at the current site for the Superman Ride. It was removed at the end of the 2002 season.

The park's current scrambler is known as the "Sidewinder" and is located in the Texas Section. It was added as part of the 10 new rides of 2006. 

 

Tags

Petting Zoo

Petting Zoo
Section
Modern
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sat, 08/14/2010 - 22:09
Last Season Operated
1983

The Petting Zoo was located in the Modern Section in what is now Looney Tunes Land. It was an original attraction when the Park opened in 1961,

The zoo, initially, sponsored by Southwestern Life Insurance was a place guests could visit and pet friendly farm animals, such as cows and goats, as well as birds, and a giant tortoise.

There was also a small seal pool. For a nominal fee, guests could purchase dead fish to feed the seals.

The highlight of attraction of the Zoo was “Sis” Flagg, the Baby Asian Elephant. Although a baby elephant, Baby elephants grow so fast that Sis had to be replaced nearly every season with a younger elephant. The original “Sis” was purchased from Thailand for $2,000.

By 1968, the season of the last “Sis”, eight elephant will have lived in the park under the same name. Representing the other political party was Sis’s companion, Tulip, the white burro. The Zoo was a significant attraction in the park until the early 70s. It dwindled down over the years until only the Seal Pond remained in the mid 70s. Over a period of a few years, it was gradually downsized until nothing remains of it today. Looney Tunes Land now occupies the space which held the Zoo.

 

 

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Petting Zoo

    The Story of Sis, the Six Flags Elephant is now online at: Sissy's (The Six Flags Elephant) Story.

 

Section

Modern Food Courts

Modern Food Courts parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 10:41

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Related Lists:
Tags

The Jet Set Ride

The Jet Set Ride parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 10:34
Parksections
Modern
Year installed
1967
Final Season
1970

Jet Set

1967 - 1970

    Introduced for 1967 was the “Jet-Set” ride. The ride was located at the current site of the train facade in Loony Tunes Land. It consisted of individual ride units designed to look like Jet Airplanes. The units each sat two people side by side in a single front seat. Each “Jet” was mounted on a pole behind the driver’s seat. The mounting allowed the Jet to move up and down along the length of the pole, as well as to rotate, so that the nose of the plane could be pointed in any direction in a 360 degree circle.

      The ride was controlled by the riders, who could lift, drop, and rotate the plane as they desired in order to pretend that they were in command of an actual jet plane.

     The ride was in the south end of the USA Section. Like the Spindletop, it was also located outside of the railroad tracks along the new path between the Front gate and Boomtown. The ride lasted only four seasons. It was removed after the 1970 season to make room for the Big Bend Roller Coaster.

      The ride was the first one built by Intamin for Six Flags Over Texas. It is possibly the first Intamin ride installed at any location. It is also possible that it was the only version of this ride every installed anywhere.

 

 

Related Lists:
Tags

Big Bend

Big Bend
Section
Modern
Year installed
1971
parktimes Sat, 08/14/2010 - 21:18
Last Season Operated
1978

1971 - 1978

      In 1971, Six Flags introduced the Big Bend Roller Coaster. The name “Big Bend” was a clever play on words, since it refers both to the many “bends” felt by the riders on the curving, “bending”, track, as well as Texas’ rugged Big Bend National park, with its diverse rivers, mountains and deserts.

      The ride was installed five years after the introduction of the Mine Train. Six Flags purchased the Big Bend from Schwarzkopf Company of Germany, Beginning in 1974, Schwarzkopf was represented in the United States by the Intamin Company.  The name INTAMIN is taken from the phrase INTernational AMusement INstallations.

     The Big Bend had many features that stand out, even by today’s standards. The roller coaster was what Schwarzkopf denoted a “Speed Racer” style coaster. Rather than bench style “side-by-side” seating, in which two riders sit next to each other, the Big Bend cars had a “toboggan” style bench seat, in which two riders straddled the seat and sit in front and back of each other, similar to the configuration of the log ride units. .

     The seats were deep in the vehicle, with a high side railing. This configuration negated any need for seat belts or other restraints. Restraints were, however, added after a few years of operation.

     The ride was also different in that unlike most roller coasters, which have some type of independent lift mechanism which pulls or lifts the units to the top of the lift hills. Instead, the Big Bend cars had their own motors in the units which “drove” the units to the top of the lift hills. The motors were activated by a third rail, in between the two track rails, much like an electric train.

      Once over the top of the hill, the third rail ended and the trains were left to roll around the track at speeds of up to 52 mph.

      The unique lift arrangements allowed the coaster to have more visually interesting, and suspense building, spiraling style lifts, rather than the straight up hill normally associated with roller coasters.

     The Big Bend was built in the modern USA section, in keeping with its futuristic appearance. The dock and queue line were located along the same platform which had previously served as the Jet Set, which was removed for the installation of this ride.

     The ride had two of the spiraling lift hills, the first was 81 feet tall, significantly higher than the more established Runaway Mine train. The second was 51 feet tall. The track length was 2,876 feet, slightly shorter than the Mine train track.

     The ride was an immediate success and become extremely popular.

     The ride was removed at the end of the 1978 season for various reasons.

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Section

Cliffhanger

Cliffhanger parktimes Sat, 08/14/2010 - 23:03
Parksections
Modern
Year installed
1982
Final Season
2007

Cliffhanger

The Cliffhanger was a 128 foot tall “L” shaped tower built by Intamin.

Riders sat in small gondolas which were lifted by an elevator mechanism 128 feet to the top of the tower’s structure. There they moved forward, outside of the lift mechanism, onto an outside track. Once properly positioned, the units were released for a free fall ten floors straight down the tower. Near the bottom, the track gradually curved, changing directions 90 degrees, so that it was parallel to the ground. The car then ran down the parallel track with the riders on their backs until it stopped.

The first of its kind ride cost the park 2.1 million dollars. A Six Flags press release for the ride notes that when riding the Cliffhanger, “the sensation is the same you would feel if you stepped off the roof of a ten story building.” As with the Flume and the mine train, the Cliffhanger was immediately copied.

Later, the Modern section was rethemed as an “Air Force Base and Astronaut training center” as part of the addition of the “Right Stuff Theater”. At that time the Cliffhanger was renamed as the “G-Force”, and themed as an astronaut training mechanism. Even later the ride was renamed as the Wildcatter and themed with the Boomtown section. Despite the fact that the ride became part of the Boomtown section, it was not physically moved. Its location was always on the border between the Boomtown and Modern Sections. Instead of moving the ride, the Boomtown section was simply expanded into the area around the Cliffhanger. The size of the Modern USA section was reduced accordingly.

The ride imploded in 2007.

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Tags

Aquaman Splashwater (Splashdown Falls)

Aquaman Splashwater (Splashdown Falls)
Section
Modern
Year installed
1966
parktimes Sat, 08/14/2010 - 22:21
Last Season Operated
Operating

Aquaman Splashdown (Splashwater Falls)

      Both the Flume ride and the Rolling Rapids have established that crowds in the Texas heat will appreciate a ride that gets them wet. Splashdown Falls, built in 1986 and opening in 1987, was built as the simplest ride that could accomplish this task. The ride is now named the “Aquaman”, based on one of the DC Comic Characters.

          The design consists of a large lift hill, which pulls the rides’ six boats over fifty feet in the air. The boats then travel through a 180 degree curve section, where they then fall down a 45 foot drop at a 35 degree angle into a splash pool below. The twenty foot boats are each designed to hold 20 riders sitting in five rows of bench seats, for an hourly capacity of 1,800.

     Up to twenty riders sitting in the boats five bench style rows, all experience some degree of splash. In addition, the riders could wait on the exit bridge after disembarking for the next boat to fall. Doing so, they could experience the full impact of the boats splash, virtually guaranteeing that they will be soak through and through.

      The 800-foot ride uses 250,000 gallons of water, circulated around the ride by a 180 Horsepower pumping station. The ride was built by O.D. Hopkins Associates. Inc of New Hampshire.

      The ride's name was inconsistent over the years. It was known as Splashwater Falls, just "Splashwater", and Splashdown Falls in various publications The ride was later renamed the “Splashdown Reentry Test Simulation” to correspond with the retheming of the modern section to an Astronaut training center with the addition of the “Right Stuff” simulator. The current name is "Aquaman Splashdown".

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Section

Adventure Theater

Adventure Theater
Section
Modern
Year installed
1995
parktimes Sat, 08/14/2010 - 22:55
Last Season Operated
2010

      For 1995, Six Flags once again offered a new virtual reality theater. This theater, unlike the Sensational Sense Machine, did not feature a building which rolled or turned. Instead, for the Right Stuff Theater, the seats themselves pivoted and rotated based on the action on the screen, giving the rider the sense that they were participating in whatever action was depicted on the screen.

      The first movie shown in the theater was the “Right Stuff”, for which the theater was originally named. The “Right Stuff” simulated flight in a modern Jet Fighter. It should not be confused with the full length feature film of the same name.

       In 1999, the move was changed to "Escape from Dino Island." The following are the movies played during the life of the theater:

  1995 Right Stuff 
  1996 Right Stuff 
  1997 Right Stuff 
  1998 Right Stuff 
  1999 Escape From Dino Island 3-D
  2000 Escape From Dino Island 3-D
  2001 Escape From Dino Island 3-D
  2002 Space Shuttle America
  2003 Right Stuff
  2004 SpongeBob
  2005 SpongeBob
  2006 SpongeBob
  2007 Fly Me to the Moon
  2008 Fly Me to the Moon
  2009 Fly Me to the Moon
  2010 Robots of  Mars

In addition, special features were played during Fright Fest and Holiday in the Park.

After the Right Stuff ended, the theater was known as the Adventure Theater and the 3D Adventure Theater. 

 

Que House

Escape from Dino Island:

 

 

Que House

The original Right Stuff Theater.

 

 

Section

Looney Tunes Land

Looney Tunes Land parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 10:36
Parksections
Modern
Year installed
1984

Looney Tunes Land

Looney Tunes Land

In 1984, the Six Flags chain’s purchased Marriott’s Great America park. Great America held a license to use the Warner Brother’s Looney Tunes characters in the park since it opened in 1976. With the purchase, Warner Brothers expanded the license with Six Flags to include its other six parks, including Six Flags Over Texas. Six Flags now had access to a wealth of well-known and established characters to use within the parks. The characters became the park’s official mascots.

Several Six Flags Over Texas attractions were renovated to feature the various characters. The entire Pac-Man Land children’s section was rethemed to become the more child friendly Looney-Tunes Land.

While there was little change in the attractions available, there were changes in the names of the attractions. In the soft play area, the air pillows became the Porky Pig Play Pen and the ball pit was renamed as Tweety Bubbles. The children’s Ferris wheel became the Elmer Fudd Fewwis Wheel; the Rugged Buggy became the Roadrunner Runaround; and the Red Baron became the Tasmanian Devil Flying Aces. A fourth ride, a small boat carousel, was added and designated as Daffy Duck Lake. The other rides were relocated a small distance in order to make room for the boat ride.

In 1991, Loony Tunes Land underwent a major remodeling. As a part of the renovation, four new rides replaced activities in the soft play area.

One was the Martian Escape, a mini-swing ride manufactured by Zamperla, a ride manufacturer that specializes in smaller rides. The Martian Escape was a child’s version of the Texas Tornado swing ride. The ride was installed in the middle of Looney Tunes Land. In 2000, the name of the ride was changed and it was moved south of the railroad tracks.

Martian Escape, a mini-swing ride was installed in 1991 as part of the revitalization of Looney Tunes Land. In 2001 it was moved to a different location in the section and renamed Michigan J. Frog’s Tinseltown Parade.

The second new ride was a small train ride named Sylvester’s Jr.’s Train. The train was a Zamperla Rio Grande style train. Guests could ride in the engine cab, the tender, a gondola, or a passenger car. The ride was located under a covering to the east side of Looney Tunes Land.

The Convoy was the third new ride. The Convoy is a Zamperla Convoy truck style ride. The ride units resemble semi-trailer trucks, with cab seating for two children and an open back seat for an adult and child or two children. The trucks are connected to each other to form a train. It was installed in an open area on the west side of Looney Tunes Land. The Convoy is still located in the park at its original location. It is now known as Speedy Gonzales’ Truckin’ Across America.

The forth new ride was Porky Pig’s Magic Wheel, an Eli Bridge Company standard small Ferris wheel with twelve bench seats. Porky Pig’s Magic Wheel was larger than the park’s current Elmer Fudd Fewwis Wheel. It was added south of the railroad tracks, near the location of the section’s current four children’s rides. The ride was removed in 2001.

In addition to the new rides, a small jumping water fountain was placed at the north entrance in the section. The fountain was removed in 2006 and replaced with the Looney Tunes Gazebo stage.

As part of the Looney Tunes theming, the Kooper Kettle restaurant was renamed as Wascal’s Burgers and Fries.

At the end of the 1997 season, the smaller of the park’s two Ferris wheels, the Elmer Fudd Ferris Wheel, was removed from Looney Tunes Land.

The section underwent major changes in 2001. As part of a major overhaul, the name was changed from Looney Tunes Land to Looney Tunes, USA. Added was the Canyon Blaster roller coaster, as well as five other new small children’s rides.

A mini Empire Tower drop ride named Taz’s New York Adventure was added in the same location at which the small Porky Pig’s Fewwis Wheel had stood. For this ride, youngsters ride a bench seat that rises approximately 20-feet up the front of the “Empire State building”. When it reaches the top, the seat jumps up and down as it returns to the ground level.

The second ride was the Daffy for President Tour Bus. Known as a Crazy Bus style ride, guests sit in a small bus shaped unit that rotates in a vertical circle. The ride was also referred to as the Looney Tunes Capital Tours bus ride in some promotional materials. It is decorated as both a Hollywood tour bus and a presidential campaign bus.

The third ride, a teacup style ride named Yosemite Sam’s Texas Tea Cups, allows riders to ride in Texas style “oil barrel” teacups. The ride is located at the former site of the Daffy Duck Lake boats.

The forth ride was a miniature bumper car ride, the Route 66 Bumper Cars. Each car represented a different Looney Tunes’ character.

These four rides were manufactured by the SBF-VISA Group.

The fifth new ride was Sylvester & Tweety’s State Fair-is Wheel. This was the third Ferris wheel located in the section. It is a Zamperla mini-Ferris wheel. This wheel has six enclosed balloon shaped units. It is located at the site of the larger Porky Pig’s Magic Wheel, which was removed.

In addition to adding the new rides, each of the remaining current rides in the section were renovated and rethemed. The small Red Baron airplane ride became the Bugs Bunny’s Spirit of St. Looie. The miniature swing ride was moved and renamed Michigan J. Frog’s Tinseltown Parade, also called Michigan J. Frog’s Tinseltown Revue. The Zamperla convoy truck ride became Speedy Gonzales’ Truckin’ Across America. The miniature train ride became Elmer Fudd’s America the Beautiful Railway.

A new Looney Tunes Land Stage was added for live outdoor shows. In order to make room for the new rides, the Rugged Buggy was removed from the park. The Rugged Buggy was the park’s first off the shelf small children’s ride. The Daffy Duck Lake small boat ride was also removed at that time.

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Tags

ACME Rock-n-Rocket

ACME Rock-n-Rocket
Section
Modern
Year installed
2006
parktimes Thu, 07/07/2016 - 22:47
Last Season Operated
2014

The Acme Rock-n-Rocket was added in the 2006 season as part one the ten new attractions added for the year. It was located in the Modern Section, next to the Adventure Theater, close to where the Modern Astrolift had stood. Shaped like a cartoon firecracker rocket, the ride is similar to the Conquistador. Unlike the Conquistador, however, the Rock-n-Rocket turned riders completely upside-down as it swung 84-feet in the air and around in a full 360-degree circle. The ride lasted two minutes and thirty seconds. The rocket held up to fifty-riders, for an estimated hourly capacity of 650 riders.

Both the Conquistador and the Rock-n-Rocket were manufactured by Intamin. The Rock-n-Rocket is a Looping Starship style ride. Parts for the ride were relocated from Astroworld when the park was closed. The rocket unit in which the riders sit was manufactured for Six Flags Over Texas.

The ride was removed in 2014 to make room for the JUSTICE LEAGUE: Battle for Metropolis.

 

splashpr.jpg (35628 bytes)

 

Section

Pandemonium

Pandemonium
Section
Modern
Year installed
2008
parktimes Mon, 07/04/2016 - 18:14

The  Pandemonium opened in 2008 on and around the former site of the Cliffhanger. It was originally named the Tony Hawk Big Spin for the extreme sport athlete, Tony Hawk, and his “big spin” skateboarding maneuver.  The name was changed in 2010 to The  Pandemonium.

The ride consists of eight single car units with four seats each. Each unit is mounted on a round base that allows it to spin around in a 360 degree circle as it travels around the track.

The ride was built by Gerstlauer Amusement Rides of Germany at a cost of $6.5 million dollars.

The ride lift is 53 feet high with a 27-foot initial drop. The units travel around the 1,351 foot long at 31 mph.

The ride is designed for a throughput of 800 riders per hour with a ride run of 1 minutes and 51 seconds.

The Big Spin is similar to other Tony Hawk’s Big Spin rides that opened the season before at Six Flags Fiesta Texas and Six Flags Saint Louis. The ride opened as Mr. Six’s Pandemonium at Six Flags New England in 2005. Another Big Spin opened at Six Flags Discovery Kingdom in the 2008 season. The Texas, Fiesta Texas, and St Louis rides are identical, while the Discovery Kingdom ride varies somewhat.

Que House

Section

JUSTICE LEAGUE: Battle for Metropolis

JUSTICE LEAGUE: Battle for Metropolis
Section
Modern
Year installed
2015
parktimes Mon, 07/04/2016 - 23:43

The Justice League opened for the 2015 season at the site of the 3D Adventure Theater. 

Guests ride in small six seat vehicles equipment with lazer guns at each seat. The riders use the guns to shoot at evil targets as they travel through the 20,000 square foot ride. The ride's scenes include props, movies and other images viewed through 3d glasses. The goal is to save several superheros that have been kidnapped by villains.

The ride has 10 ride units.

Props and animatronic characters were manufactured by Sally Manufacturing.

 

Que House

 

Que House

Section

Texas SkyScreamer

Texas SkyScreamer
Section
Modern
Year installed
2013
parktimes Mon, 07/04/2016 - 14:22

The Texas SkyScreamer is a giant swing ride which opened in May, 2013.

The ride is 400 feet high and spins at 35 mph. There are 12 units, with two seats each, for a total capacity of 24. As the swings spin, the circle that they travel in becomes 124 foot wide. The ride lasts 2 minutes, 45 seconds.

The ride is a "Star Flyer" type ride manufactured by Austrian manufacturer Funtime.

 

Que House

 

Que House

 

Que House

 

Que House

Section

France

France
Section
France
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 11:16

    

     The original French section recreated Fort St. Louis, which was established by French explorer Rene Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle, along the Lavaca River, near Matagorda Bay. The Fort was established in 1685 and abandoned four years later.

 

    The original attractions consisted for the reconstructed Fort, which had a lookout post that children could enter, LaSalle's River Boat Ride, and Pierre's Treasures, a small gift store.

 

    The major change to the section was the removal of the Riverboat ride, to be replaced in 1983 with the  Roaring Rapids.  Most of the structure of the fort is still in place, although the lookout post is no longer open. 

 

France

 

LaSalle's River Adventure

LaSalle's River Adventure
Section
France
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 11:26
Last Season Operated
1982

La Salle's River Adventure
1961 - 1982

[Click on Pictures for Larger Views]

Related pages:

frrenter.jpg (26689 bytes)    La Salle's River Adventure was one of the original rides, opening with the park in 1961. Located in the French section, the fleet of French riverboats traveled the replica of the Lavaca River until 1982, when the ride was closed to make room for the roaring rapids. The last trip was on August 15, 1982.

    The ride was part of the recreation of Fort St. Louis that constituted the French section. Fort St. Louis was established by Rene' Robert Cavelier Sieur de La Salle on Matagorda bay in 1685.

    The ride took approximately forty guests and their riverboat captain on a journey down the Lavaca River in search of an alternate route to the Mississippi river sought by La Salle./sections/france/frriverq.jpg (67496 bytes)

    The riverboat captain was also the ride narrator. The ride started with an explanation that a more experienced riverboat captain and two trained river scouts, Jacque and Pierre, had been sent up ahead.

    Around the first corner, however, it was discovered that the river outpost had been attacked by Indians. The riverboat captain has been killed. The crew goes on, in hopes that Jacque and Pierre are still down the river.

    The boat travels a little further to one of the ride's, and the park's, most impressive animations. The boat comes face to face with a recreation of a Spanish fort. As the boot approaches the fort, a Spanish conquistador rises up from behind the fort wall and waives his sword. On his signal, the fort's three cannon begin to fire, sending water shooting up all around the boat.

    The boat survives, only to find Jacque and Pierre hanging from a tree. Not wanting to risk the Spanish fort again, the boat travels on through a French and Indian cross-fire, past wild animals, more Indians, and past a beaver colony, where a tree falls just inches from the boat.

    The finale of the ride came as the river dead-ends into a water-fall in front of a rock-wall. The river is too narrow to turn around, so the Captain is forced to simply stop the boat. As the boat stops, the water pouring down in front of the rock wall suddenly diverts and begins rushing down the side of the rocks. As it does, the rock-wall opens, revealing a cave.

    The boat moves forward again, entering the cave. When the boat is completely inside the cave, the rock-wall behind the boat closes, trapping the boat. The cave is revealed to be an Indian treasure cave, with the remains of prior explorers and treasure.

      In exchange for not bothering the cave's contents, the cave's front doors open and the boat travel's out, only to discover that it has traveled back to Fort St. Louis. Another safe journey.

    The 25 foot fiberglass boats ran on a track which was composed of a slightly deeper channel in the middle of the river A tire mounted sideways on an axel descend from the front and back of the boat. The tires rode inside the channel, guiding the boat around the river.

    A small antenna wire on the top of each boat triggered the various animations when it contacted small wires running across the river just before each scene.

    A docking area next to the Spanish fort was home for seven of the boats. This was also the location from which boats could be placed and removed from the water.

Picture of Current River Boats    After the ride was closed, some of the boats were sold to the nearby 'Lion Country Safari' amusement park. It eventually closed. A few of the boats were given outboard engines and actual steering capacity and are still in service as tourist boats at Cypress Bayou in Jefferson County, Texas.

 

River Pictures

River Pictures parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 13:55

River Pictures

Spanish Fort firing on the Riverboat. fortfire.jpg (92735 bytes)
Riverboat outrunning the Cannon Shots. frfort2.jpg (62354 bytes)
Waiting for another boat. spfort.jpg (24024 bytes)
Jacque and Pierre, hanging from a tree. frj&p.jpg (84824 bytes)
Jacque and Pierre, hanging from a tree in later years. (Note different costumes.) rwjandp.jpg (32470 bytes)
French settlers in gun battle with the Indians. frrvrxfire.jpg (60185 bytes)
Another View. crossfire.jpg (30349 bytes)
Alligator looking for a "hand-out." alligator.jpg (22372 bytes)
Indian war canoe. frrvwarc.jpg (42690 bytes)
Indian Village with Medicine man. frrvrivill.jpg (46610 bytes)
Another View. medman.jpg (54268 bytes)
Bear fighting off Timber Wolves. beareatingwolfs.jpg (25497 bytes)
Beaver felling tree. frrvrbvr.jpg (32110 bytes)
Boat coming into dock. riverlft.jpg (66838 bytes)
Boat docking. juliette.jpg (60022 bytes)
Aerial view of river area, with Roaring rapids superimposed. frrvrair.jpg (98433 bytes)

Spiel - 1970s

Spiel - 1970s parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 11:37

LaSalle's River Adventure Spiel
Six Flags Over Texas
Mid 1970s

Good day my friends, I would like to welcome you aboard our little French Riverboat the [Nadine, Elizabeth (Belle), Juliet, Annabelle, Henrietta, Suzanne, Marguerite, Maria, Isabelle, Paulette, Georgette]

I am your captain and as we pull away from the dock, I would like to remind you to keep your arms and legs inside the boat at all times, for if you leave them out for just a 'little too long', ....they may come back a 'little too short'.

Leaving the Dock

Boat pulls away from dock and starts around a corner

For we will be traveling down the dangerous Lavaca river which in 1861, our leader, Cavalier De LaSalle sailed looking for an alternate route to the Mississippi River. But he has was never been heard from since.

So that we don't meet up with his same fate, I have sent ahead a French Riverboat captain and two river scouts, Jacques and Pierre, there camp should be just around this bend,

but wait? /excited voice/.... oh no? it looks as though the Indians have attacked the camp.

Campsite

a campsite; fires burning from the battle;
dead Indian figures laying on the ground;
dead riverboat pilot lying on a sea chest with an arrow in his back

There is our river boat captain, lying on his chest. That's him in the arrow shirt. It looks as though he got the point of the Indian message.

But I don't see our river scouts, Jacques or Pierre, anywhere about, perhaps they escaped with their lives and we can find them as we continue our journey down the river. I certainly hope so, because we will be lost without them.

Over to my left is a pack of hungry timber wolfs and it looks like they had someone over for dinner. I don't think that they will be bothering us.

Timber wolfs

Pack of wolfs sitting around a pile of bones.

Over to my right is a more friendly scene. Some friendly Tejas Indians are helping the Friar build the Mission San Francisco de los Tejas.

Spanish Mission

Partial log mission, Indians carrying logs
Friar looking at scroll and nodding up and down.

You know, though, they have been building that Mission for 17 years and they still aren't through. Maybe they should just rename it....'Mission Impossible.'

But wait, /quietly/ up ahead is a Spanish Fort. And as you all know, Spain and France have been at war for ten long years over this little piece of land known as Texas. Perhaps if we are very quiet, we can sneak by. But wait, they have spotted us.

Spanish Fort

frfort1sm.jpg (9116 bytes)Spanish Officer raises up in the fort watch tower
and drops his sword signaling the cannons to fire.
Each of three cannons begin to fire, three times each.]frfort2sm.jpg (8688 bytes)

// As the cannons fire

Oh no. I near miss to the front and another to the side. We will have to abandoned ship, Women and Children first, AFTER THE CAPTAIN OF COURSE. But wait, they have stopped. It appears as though the Spanish can't even hit the broad side of a little French River boat and we can continue on our journey in safety.

But don't look to my right. There's Jacques and Pierre, our two French River Scouts, hanging from that tree.

Jacques and Pierre

 

frj&p2sm.jpg (4351 bytes)Two French river scout type figures
are hanging by their necks from a tree branch.

Oh well:

It looks like they are at the 'ends of their ropes'.
Oh Jacque and Pierre, they always were the 'swingers of the swamps'.
There they are, just 'hanging around'.
It seems that they found the last 'stretch of the river.'

I guess we will just have to travel on without them, but wait, look up in that tree, it is the Famous French Fur Trapper, Francis. I'll just ask him if it is safe to go on.

Fur Trapper

French fur trapper sitting high in a tree, shaking his head.

 
// Yell out of the boat.
 
Francis, is it safe to go on?

Look, as you can clearly see, he is shaking his head back and forth, which in French means ? 'no.' We could turn around, but I don't think we would get past that Spanish Fort again, so we will have to continue onward.

You can also see Francis shaking his leg back and forth. After 17 years in that tree, I think that is French for... 'I need to go to the restroom.'

But wait, did you hear something ahead?

//popping sound

Cross Fire

Indians on inside of river shooting at Frenchman hiding behind wine barrels on the outside of the river. Wine is leaking out of barrels shot in the fire fight.frrvrxfire.jpg (60185 bytes)

Oh no, we are caught in a cross fire between these Indians on this side and our own Frenchman on the other. Everyone down to the bottom of the boat, for it would be quite a shame to be shot by one of our own country men.

I think that we made it safely by.

But look what the Indians have done to those barrels of wine. Once King Louie finds out what is happening to the wine that he is shipping to Texas, he will start sending Milk instead.

We have now entered the most dangerous part of the river, the 'uncharted territories'. As you can see, everywhere are dangerous alligators, just waiting to make a meal of us. Why I have been told that there was once an English Teacher that stuck her hand outside of the boat right here,

 // pointing to alligators open mouth....
and now, she is teaching 'shorthand.'

Oh no, everyone down, that's a Caddo war party and those arrows are poisoned tipped, one scratch would mean instance death. That was very close, luckily they have decided not to fire.

War Canoe

war canoe appears and moves behind the bushesfrrvwarc.jpg (42690 bytes)

 
Pop-Up Bear

beside the boar on the other side, a bear pops up and growls

Don't worry, that just a bear fishing for his dinner in the river.

Over here is a Caddo Indian burial pier, the Indians buried their dead six feet above the ground in the hopes that that would give them a head start to the happy hunting grounds above.

Here a momma bear and her cubs are stealing some honey from those bees. And boy are those bees mad. Then again, I bet you would be pretty mad if you came home one night and found out that some animals was ? trying to steal 'your honey.'

Over here is an Indian village and the Medicine man is trying to ward off the evil sprits.

Indian Village

Hay ya, Hay ya, Hay ya
Indian Medicine man dancing around pot on the fire
Indian women cleaning clothes in the river

But wait, //excited// if you look carefully, you will see that all of the warriors are gone from the village. And when all of the Indian warriors are gone from an Indian village, it can only mean one thing,

.....'they are somewhere else.' Lets hope that we don't find out where.

Wait, everyone quite, there's a cougar looking for his dinner, one wrong move and we will be it.

Quite everyone, ? careful,

Careful,

The Cougar

cougar is on a branch hanging out over
the river next to the boat, slowly the
boat passes the cougar by.
// Very loud scream:

on no, look out. 

// calmer // - I thought he had that little fat man at the back of the boat.

Bear fighting Timber wolfs

Large bear waving off five timber wolfs.

frrvrbrfgt.jpg (41162 bytes)

Here to my right a bear is fight off a pack of hungry timber wolfs. And as you can clearly see, he is fighting them... 'bear handed'. I bet that he will... 'barely' escape from that situation. I just can't ...'bear' to watch.

Look though, there are only five wolfs in that pack. If there had been one more, that poor bear would have been up against 'a six-pack'.

Oh no, everyone to the side of the boat, as you can see on my right, there's a river whirlpool dragging that poor soul to a watery grave.

The Whirlpool

hand sticking up from the water
holding a stick going
around (causing?) in a whirlpool

There is one thing that I can say about him however, he sure knows his way 'around' this swamp?

....and around? and around?w

Over here is a more friendly scene, a group of beavers are hard at work building a dam. But wait a minute, look out,

Beavers

..sections/france/frrvrbvr.jpg (32110 bytes)

Beavers standing in clearing near small tree
//excited// that tree is going to fall,

T  I  M --- B  E  R.

 

 

Why, I do believe if that tree had been just a little bit longer, this boat would have been ....just a little 'bit shorter'.

'Leave it to Beaver' to pull a stunt like that.

It seems that one have come to a fork in the river and I don't know which way to go. I guess we should try this way.

But look out, everyone down. We are surrounded by Caddo Warriors. I guess we should have gone the other way.

War Party

Indians on both sides of the River
threaten the boat with spears and arrows.

Everyone smile and perhaps they will think we are friendly. It looked like it worked, they are letting us pass,

but, oh no, here is why. We are heading for a waterfall and a solid rock wall behind it. The river is much to narrow to turn around here and we can't go back past those warriors. I guess this is the end of our journey

The Waterfall

ahead is a Water fall and behind it is a solid rock wall.

 
// The captain stops the boat.

But wait, the wall is opening.

// Boat starts back up.

We must have discovered a secret Indian treasure cave, for the Indians were known to hide their treasure in caves such as this.

The Cave

treasure chest with dead skeletons. (as opposed to live skeletons?)
looks more like a pirate cave than an Indian cave.

Look out,

// skeleton swings out from the dark.

It looks like that pour sucker has been on 'a crash diet'.

There is the treasure, it looks like many that have tried to take it have paid with their lives.

Oh no, the walls behind us are closing, we are trapped inside.

// boat moving very slowly.

But wait, the walls in front are opening, the Indians are repaying us with our lives for not disturbing their treasure.

And look, there is the flag of France, viva La France, we have made it back to Fort St. Louis and safety.

Back to Dock

/sections/france/FRriverlftsm.jpg (4973 bytes)

Back where we started

..sections/france/frjuliettesm.jpg (5048 bytes)

As the boat approaches the dock, I would like to remind you to keep your arms and legs inside the boat and please remain seated until the boat comes to a complete stop.

I hope you enjoy your day here at fun filled Six Flags Over Texas.

Crew claps and cheers and goes wild.

End of Spiel

 

Unloading Spiel: // in sort of a rambling manner.

Please watch you head as your heading out, and watch your step as your stepping out, but most importantly of all, watch out for my poor aching feet.

You see I have been standing on them all day long, and so have about a hundred other people. The difference is, I like to stand on the bottoms, and they like to stand on the tops.

Why just this morning a spaceship full of half-crazed Martians landed at the front gate, got out of their ship, checked their brains in at the public lockers and came down here just to step on my feet.

Enjoy your stay here at Six Flags Over Texas and remember that there is only [insert exact count] shopping days left until Christmas.

 

A few notes about this Spiel:

  1. This is not a verbatium copy of an "official spiel".  which was handed out to employees. That was more of a guideline to help each employee get started.
  2. This is very similar to what was actually said during the 1974-77 seasons.
  3. Each "River rat" spieled differently from the official spiel, other employees. Even an individual's own spiel could vary between trips. Each captain had alternate remarks for the various animations and added comments if the boat was running slow.
  4. The spiel also changed over time, especially since the animations were occasionally changed.
  5. Around 1975, one boat was renamed the "Belle" in honor of Alan Bell, a supervisor at the time, which was interesting, as one of La Salle's boats was actually named the Belle.

Confideracy Section

Confideracy Section
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:24
Last Season Operated
Operating

  The Confideracy (Old South) Section

CFFLAG.JPG (3190 bytes)  

    Between 1861 and 1865 Texas was a member of the Confederate States of America. The Confederate section, now known as the "Old South" section, recreates Texas of the mid 1800s.

    The original attractions in the Confederacy included the 1,200 seat Amphitheater, which in 1968 was converted to the 950 seat  Southern Palace. In addition, present for the first year were the  Confederate recruiting station and old south re-enactment performers, Little Dixie Carousal, and the  Butterfield Stage Coach.  A Dixieland Band provided additional entertainment and Nalar's Plantation House was one of the park's largest eating areas. 

   Skull Island was located in the Confederate section, but due to its own extensive history, themeing and numerous attractions, it is covered in a separate article.

    In 1962, the  Caddo War Canoes was added, with the original entrance to the west of the Amphitheater, in the Confederate Section. The   canoes were moved to Boomtown for the 1964 season.

    In 1964, the  Spee-Lunker's Cave Ride was added and the  Stagecoach run shortened and the Que house was moved from next to Chicken Plantation to across from Cave. At the end of the 1967 season, the  Stagecoach ride was completely removed. 

    In 1969, the Chevy Show was added at the site of the Stagecoach Que-house.

    After the 1974 season, the Little Dixie Carousal, which had been earlier renamed as the Flying Jenny, and moved down the street closer to the cave entrance, was removed.

    The Flying Jenny was replaced for the 1975 season by the  Red Baron children's ride.

   At the end of the 1982 season, the remainder of Skull Island was removed to make remove for the  Roaring Rapids.

    At the end of the 1991 season, the  Spee-lunkers were removed from Cave and replaced with Warner Brother's characters. The Ride was renamed as Gold River.

    In 1996,  Runaway Mountain opened next to the Plantation house.

Section

Butterfield Stagecoach Ride

Butterfield Stagecoach Ride
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:29
Last Season Operated
1967

Butterfield Stagecoach Ride

1961 - 1967

The Butterfield Overland Stagecoach ride offered guests a ride on an authentic stagecoach. Riders sat in the coach or rode outside on the top of the coach. The loading dock consisted of two two-story towers, one to load guests onto the ride and one to unload. The top level was used to provide access to the top level of the stagecoaches. Three coaches operated on the pathway with four horses each.

The coaches traveled through the backwoods of the park, where the guests viewed various sites, including live Buffalo. At one point, the coaches crossed a small creek. For many years, the stages also passed the “Ghost Town Saloon”, where a skeleton bartender stood serving drinks to his skeleton customers. When the Stagecoach was removed, the Saloon and its inhabitants were moved near the mine train where they can be viewed by the passengers on the Six Flags Railroad.

The stagecoach ride was removed at the end of the 1967 season to make way for the construction of the Six Flags Oil Derrick Tower.

  /sections/confideracy/stage/stage2.jpg (41819 bytes)/sections/confideracy/stage/stage1.jpg (59822 bytes)

Section

Flying Jenny (Lil' Dixie Carousel

Flying Jenny (Lil' Dixie Carousel
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1961
parktimes Fri, 07/01/2016 - 09:17
Last Season Operated
1974

The Flying Jenny was a mule drawn carousel. It was an original attraction, first located in front of the Amphitheater.  When it opened it was named the Lil' Dixie Carousel. The name was changed to avoid confusion with the Six Flags Carousel when it opened in Boomtown. 

In 1968, the ride was moved closer the Cave ride in order to accommodate the new Southern Palace, located at the site of the Amphitheater

The ride was removed after the 1974 season and the Red Baron was installed in its location.

Flying Jenny Rie

Flying Jenny Mule Ride located in lower right corner; Amphitheater located in upper left corner.

Section

Re-enactment Players

Re-enactment Players
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:30

Confederate Reenactment Players

Located across from the theater and the Skull Island dock stood one of the park’s historical recreations, the Confederate Soldier’s headquarters and recruitment station. This area was a recreation of a small confederate encampment and included a group of large tents, protected by cannon and framed by colorful civil war recruitment banners mounted on the scaffolding above the tents. Park guests could “enlist” in the Confederate army by signing on the dotted line. In addition, guests could visit with the reenactment players, who displayed their knowledge of civil war times.

The reenactment players were outfitted in the authentic distinctive gray uniform of the Confederate States of America. They marched through the streets of the confederate section and performed precision drills with their rifles. From time to time during the day, a union spy would be spotted in the crowded. At that time, the confederate soldiers would search the crowd, find the spy, and execute him by firing squad.

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Skull Island

Skull Island
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1961
parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:25
Last Season Operated

1982

  Skull Island was one of the original attractions at Six Flags Over Texas on opening day in 1961. Skull island was more of a section than just an attraction, in that it was a themed area consisting of other attractions.  From its opening in 1961, it expanded to its largest in 1968. After the opening of the tower in 1969, it dwindled down to nearly nothing, when the last remnants were removed at the end of the 1982 season. The Island was a activity area themed loosely on the exploits of Jean Lafayette, and other pirates, off the Gulf Coast.

 

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    When the park first open, guest access to the island was solely by the skull rafts. The rafts, with their gas powered engines, where design to look like a log cotton raft from the days of the old South. The trip to Skull Island started at the raft ride que house, located in the Confederate section between what was Naler's Plantation Chicken House and the Amphitheater/Southern Palace. (Now roughly the site of Runaway Mountain.)

    The rafts, guided by host and hostess, traveled across the Skull Lake to the back side of the Island, where the guests disembarked. The rafts then carried those waiting back to the dock.

    The "Skull Rock" was the central element of the Island. The skull shaped rock stood nearly two stories tall. The skull slide traveled out the left ear of the skull, turned 90 degrees, and ended to the front side of the skull. Entry to the slide was through the right ear. While waiting their turn, guest could look out through the skull's eye sockets.

    The other feature of the original attraction was the sislide.jpg (23719 bytes)Swamp Tree Slide. Access to the 30 foot high tree slide was by a steel rail staircase which spiraled around the fake tree. Once at the top guests slide down a tightly winding spiral slide located inside the hollow tree. For the ride down, the guests sat on burlap sacks.

    Skull Island was immediately expanded for the opening of the 1962 season. A whole new section of the island was opened to the north and west of the original section, in what is now the Tower area.

    The new area contained a scaled down pirate ship, on which guests could climb and play pirates. There were also paths to travel and a pirate's cave to explore. Bridges next to the loading dock connected the two sections.

    In 1963, the bridges between the sections were expanded to included a tree house on each side of the water between the old section and the new section of the 'island'. Suspension and barrel bridges connected each side. Slides come down from the 'tree house' on the new side.

    In 1964, the island was again expanded with the addition of three more Swamp tree slides on the Island in the middle of Caddo pond. Access to these tree slides was through a climbing suspension bridgebarrelbridge.jpg (56340 bytes) that started from the new section of the island, as well as a lower bridge which started at the same location. The Indian canoes circled around the Island and under the bridges.

    The Pirate ship and cave were removed before the 1966 season, although the area they were in was still part of the island.

    The construction of the Tower for the 1969 season lead to the removal of the Swamp slides on Caddo island, as well as all of the 'new section' built in 1962. Skull Island was now back to its original size. For the first time, however, access to the 'island' was not restricted to the skull rafts. Guests could now access the island from the suspension and barrel bridges that used to connect the two sections of the Island. The bridges now connected the 'Island' to the Tower area.

    The Island was virtually unchanged until the end of the 1976 season, when the Skull Rafts and last remaining tree slide were removed after sixteen years of service. The log rafts were removed from the park to make room for the Spinnaker. The que house for the rafts became the que house for the Spinnaker. The tree slide was removed to make room for a Pirate Boat theater which opened for the 1977 season. Skull Island could still be accessed from the barrel bridges, and the original attraction, the skull rock slide remained.

    The Skull rock was removed in 1978, as was the pirate ship theater. All remnants of the island were removed at the end of the 1982 season to make way for the Roaring Rapids.

    Nothing remains of Skull Island in the park today.

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Section

Spinnaker

Spinnaker
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1977
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 22:26
Last Season Operated
1995

New for 1977 was the Spinnakker, an Enterprise Style ride built by Intamin. Located just south of the Tower, the ride was composed of swingin gondolas units in which 1 or 2 guest sat. The ride would start parallel to the ground, where it would start to spin around, similar to carousel. It would spin continuously until the capsules were pointing straight out, parallel to the ground. At that point, the ride’s arm lifted up to a 90 degree angle, so that the riders were spinning up and down, as with a Ferris wheel. The difference with a Ferris wheel, however, is that the ride spun very fast, and when the gondolas reached the top of the circle, the riders were turned upside down. The spinnaker was a very popular ride at amusement parks. It was a very visual entertainment, especially at night when it was well light. The Spinnakker was removed and installed at Six Flags Fiesta Texas, where it was dubbed the “Wagon Wheel.”

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Tree Slides

Tree Slides parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:42

Skull Island TreeSlides

 

 

siflag.jpg (3105 bytes)Skull Island

sislide.jpg (23719 bytes)

Southern Palace

Southern Palace
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1968
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:37

The Southern Palace


Southern Palace

    The Southern Palace was built for the 1968 season. Prior to that time, an Amphitheater was at this location.

Season Show Show Two Theater
1961 Variety show   Amphitheater
1962 Six Flags Campus Revues    Amphitheater
1963 Six Flags Campus Revues: Gilchrist Clitters   Amphitheater
1964 Six Flags Campus Revues: The Singing Flags   Amphitheater
1965 Six Flags Campus Revue: Thank You Mr. President”, subtitled “A New Play with Old Music   Amphitheater
1966 Six Flags Campus Revue:  Let’s Do It, (Let’s Find a Cause)   Amphitheater
1967 Six Flags Campus Revue:  Numbers Games   Amphitheater
1968 Red, White and Blue Revue BC-TV Southern Palace
1969 Fabulous Flickers   Southern Palace
1970 45 minutes from Broadway Sing-in-70 Southern Palace
1971 Sing Out! America   Southern Palace
1972 Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance!   Southern Palace
1973 The Passing Parade (Original Parade of Progress)(Gilbert Girls)   Southern Palace
1974 Great to Be Here*   Southern Palace
1975 Jukebox Jubilee   Southern Palace
1976 Celebrate!   Southern Palace
1977 "Good Times, Good Music, Good Friends"    Southern Palace
1978 Jazz Crazy!   Southern Palace
1979     Southern Palace
1980 Six Flags Follies   Southern Palace
1981 Six Flags’ Follies    Southern Palace
1982 America - Saluting American Music   Southern Palace
1983     Southern Palace
1984 Star Struck   Southern Palace
1985 Celebrate America! <new - 85 fact sheet>   Southern Palace
1986     Southern Palace
1987 The Incredible Acrobats of China * Stars & Stripes Salute!” ("All American Revue" on some materials) Southern Palace
1988 The Incredible Acrobats of China * June 5 to July 2 Stars & Stripes Salute Southern Palace
1989 Flashback, the Musical Texas Themed  Southern Palace
1990     Southern Palace
1991 PIZZAZZ!*    Southern Palace
1992 We are the World (Do you hear the people sing?)   Southern Palace
1993 Ice Express (First SP Ice show) (Chevrolet/GEO) Southern Palace Southern Palace
1994 Warner Music Rock Revue * Pure Country also Southern Palace
1995 Hot Rockin' Country *   Southern Palace
1996 Hot Rockin' Country *   Southern Palace
1997 Hot Rockin' Country   Southern Palace
1998 Hot Rockin' Country   Southern Palace
1999 Hooray for Hollywood!   Southern Palace
2000     Southern Palace
2001 American Rock * David Blackburn   Southern Palace
2002 State of Rhythm    Southern Palace
2003 The State of Rhythm *   Southern Palace
2004 The State of Rhythm It's Alright * Southern Palace
2005 The Amazing Acrobats of China It's Alright * Southern Palace
2006 The Amazing Acrobats of China * Hello Texas (Spring Show) Southern Palace
2007 X-Treme Country   Southern Palace
2008 Dick Clark’s Academy of Country Music: Back Trax Southern Palace
2009 Country is my Rock   Southern Palace
2010 Country is my Rock   Southern Palace
2011 Chart-Toppers 5.0 *   Southern Palace
2012 Iluminate   Southern Palace
2013 Chart-Toppers 5.2   Southern Palace
2014 Chart-Toppers 5.3   Southern Palace
2015 Chart-Toppers 5.4   Southern Palace
2016 Chart-Toppers 5.5   Southern Palace

 

 

Section

Let's Find a Cause

Let's Find a Cause
Section
Confederacy
parktimes Tue, 07/05/2016 - 17:41

Following are pictures from the 1966 production of "Let's Find a Cause." Of the cast, the ventriloquist Jay Johnson went on to be a star of the hit comedy  SOAP and Cissy King became a dancer on the famous Lawrence Welk ShowPhotos courtesy of Cast Member LaVerne Huselton Catter.

 

Let's Find a Cause ~ Campus Review 1966


Unidentified Show Girl, Jay Johnson (of SOAP)
LaVerne Huselton Catter, Unidentified Show Girl


Unidentified Show Girl, Jay Johnson (of SOAP)
Cissy King (future dancer on Lawrence Welk Show)

Related Lists
Section

Speelunker Cave

Speelunker Cave
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1964
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:34
Last Season Operated
1991

The Cave Ride opened in the park in 1964, making it the sixth oldest operating ride in the park. The Cave Ride was perhaps one of the most innovated rides at Six Flags Over Texas. Of course, the Cave took its inspiration from Dark Rides everywhere. Floating through a dark tunnel was certainly not a new concept, even in 1964.

The ride is simple in design and operation. Riders float through the ride in small "tubs". The "tubs" are basically a variation on the Flume's Logs. This makes sense, since  the Cave "river" is basically the same as the Flume "trough". The "tubs" have change somewhat overtime, with the seating going from around the inside, to front to back, as with the logs, to side by side in rows.

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    What made the Cave special, however, was that it was inhabited by Six Flags Spee-Lunkers, a characteristic that made it unique among dark rides. The Spee-Lukners are small creatures, about four feet tall. There most prominent feature is their long  triangulars faces.

    The ride had no real story line, the riders simply saw the Spee-Lunkers doing various activities. Highlights of the trip included, the storm scene, complete with lightening and thunder; the barrel, in which the tub went through a large barrel which rotated around it, creating the illusion that the through was rotating; and the air and water sprayers at the end of the ride.

cfclprs1.jpg (17946 bytes)

    Some scenes were removed and replaced with other scenes as the years went on, so the ride was not exactly the same over the years. At the end of the 1991 season, the Spee-Lunkers were removed from the cave and replaced with characters from the Warner Brother's Looney-Tunes. Due to the significant changes made in the animinations. the ride after 1991 is covered in the Gold River Pages.

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      cfcavehp.jpg (34326 bytes)

 

 

 

 

     

      The Spee-Lunker scenes, in order as much as possible, were:

Speelunker
Writing on Stone Table

One Spee-lunker writing with a hammer and chisel on a large stone tablet. Made a distinctive "chinging" sound.

Three Speelunkers
Riding turtles

Three Speelunkers riding in a large circle in and out of a cave. The turtles were mounted on a carousel type mount, so the speelunkers road around in a large circle

Treasure Chest

A large treasure chest. Over the years, different treasures were featured, including the standard jewels, gasoline cans during the gas shortage and coffee bags during the coffee shortage. The lid opened and closed as the riders went by.

Two Speelukners
playing "catch" with a bolder

Two speelunkers playing "catch" with a large bolder which went out over the tub as it passed underneath.

Shark Fighter

SpeeLunker in a sinking tub  using a sword to fighting off a shark lurking up out of the water.

Mad Organist

Speelunker playing a large pipe organ with his friend pumping the organ.

cfcvorgn.jpg (39556 bytes)

Spee-Lunkner
String Band

Five spee-lunkers: a band director standing, with four string players sitting on mushrooms and playing harps;

cfspband.jpg (44160 bytes)

Spee-Lunkner
Country & Western band

In later years there was a country and western band with a bucking bull ride.

cfband.jpg (35035 bytes)

The Storm

The Storm scene started as you came upon the boat. Lightened flashed in the distance. Thunder roared and the sound of rain falling could be heard.

The Boat

As you came up on the boat, you saw the outside of a large sailing boat, which rocked back and forth. As you came around the front of the boat, it was if you were now inside the boat and seeing scenes from the boat on each side.

The Prisoners

Prisoner sawing away at his bars. (on the boat.)

cfcvjail.jpg (49250 bytes)

Card Players

Two Speelunkers sitting at a table playing a game of cards. (on the boat)

The Barrel

The tubs went through a long barrel which rotated around the riders, creating an illusion that the whole river was rotating.

The Skiers

Speelunkers skiing down a mountain. One upside down, with his head in the snow.skispee.jpg (115441 bytes)

The Finale

Speelunkers representing each of the six flags shaking hands with each other. Shown are the "Mexican" and "USA" representatives.

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cftexsp.jpg (44060 bytes)

(c) Davis McCown, 1999

Section

Gold River Adventure

Gold River Adventure
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1992
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:46

Gold River Cave Adventure

Yosemite Sam and the Gold River Adventure

       The Speelunkers cave opened for the 1992 season without the original Speelunkers. It was now the "Yosemite Sam and the Gold River Adventure ". The new version of the ride featured Bugs Bunny and the other Looney tunes characters in center stage.

       Also, known as the Gold River Adventure, the ride tells the story of Yosemite Sam’s robbery of the “payroll”. “Sheriff” Bugs Bunny and his friends are responsible for seeing that the gold is returned and that Yosemite Sam is locked up for his misdeeds. As would be anticipated, the story ends happily.

       The ride intimations and features were designed by R & R Creative Amusement Design, and built by Sally Dark Rides, a ride and animation company. According to the company, the ride contains 29 animated characters, and a total of 125 animations and other special effects.

        Although all of the inhabitants of the cave were removed and replaced, the ride structure itself remained the same. The special effects, such as the storm and rotating barrel were removed. The make-over cost $5 million dollars and opened in June of the year.

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Runaway Mountain

Runaway Mountain
Section
Confederacy
Year installed
1996
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:41

Runaway Mountain

    Runaway Mountain Rollercoaster, Six Flags’ eighth roller coaster, was added for the 1996 season.  Runaway Mountain is located in the Old South (Confederacy) section between the Southern Palace and Nalar’s Plantation house. The area had once been occupied by the Skull Island River Raft queue house and the more recently removed Spinnaker.

     Runaway Mountain utilizes single unit cars rather than the trains common with the other roller coasters. Runaway Mountains key feature is that the entire ride is inside. The darkness of the interior prevents the riders from knowing whether they are going up, down, left or right. This lack of knowledge makes the ride more thrilling, even though it is not as tall or fast as the other major coasters.

      The four seat cars reach speeds of up to 40 mph and g-forces of up to 3.6.This is actually faster than the 39 mph estimated at the time for the Texas Giant, and the 2.7 g’s pulled on the Giant. The ride includes drops of nearly 90 degrees, banked turns at 82 degrees, and two high speed horizontal spirals.

      The ride lasts one and a half minutes and can entertain a thousand guests an hour.

      The publicity for the ride resembled the story line for the original skull island.  As with the Skull island, which was located at the same spot, the mountain was said to contain gold left there by the famous pirate Jean LaFitte. The riders search for the gold as they explore the mysteries of the mountain. The ride’s tagline is the “Coaster that dares the Darkness.”

        The ride was designed using the most current computer aided design techniques and was a “heart-line design”, meaning that the riders heart was used as the center of gravity. The ride also employed state of the art computer controls as well as a chainless lift that provided much quieter operation.

     The ride was built by Premier Rides of Maryland and was originally based on three twelve passenger trains.

      In order to avoid confusion of the names, “runaway” was removed from the Runaway Mine Train’s name, which was shortened to simply the “Mine Train”

=

 

Texas Section

Texas Section
Section
Texas
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 13:01

Texas Section

/sections/texas/images/txflag.jpg (2785 bytes)     The TEXAS section recreates Texas of the old west. It consists of several stores and restaurants themed on the typical cowboy town. 

    The original section consisted of two rides, the Railroad, which is the only original ride still operating in the park, and the Astrolift.

    In addition to the rides, the Texas section featured the Gunfighters, a live show.

    Several stores and restaurants were in the section. 

    The  Chaparral Automobiles were added for the second season in 1962.

    In 1965, the Arena was added to the west of the Railroad tracks. The first show featured circus acts. In 1966, the arena featured a wild-west show. In 1970, the arena was remodeled and featured the Las Voladores Flying Indian Spectacular. The Arena closed in 1974, after the opening of the Music Mill Theater.

    The  Astrolift was removed in 1980. 

    For the 1983 season, the  Spindletop was moved to the site of the Texas Lift. 

    In 1990, the  Texas Giant wooden roller coaster was added. The  Spindletop was removed from the park in 1989, to make way for the photo booth at the exit of the Texas Giant.

 

 

 

 

txchaps5.jpg (62861 bytes)

 

 

Related Lists

Railroad

Railroad
Section
Texas
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 15:05

The Six Flags Over Texas Railroad
 See also the complete SFOT RailRoad Spiel - 1974
  See also the complete SFOT RailRoad Spiel - 1961

  /sections//texas/railroad/txrrs1.jpg (27683 bytes)

         The Six Flags Railroad is the oldest operating attraction at Six Flags Over Texas and has the distinction of being the ONLY attraction remaining from the park's initial season.

[Click on Images for larger views]

    The trains make a one mile run around the park. The ride is enhanced by the "Spiel of the Conductor", which points out the sights for the riders, highlights interesting facts about the park, and provides some "corny" entertainment. The spiel changes over the years as new attractions are added and others are removed.

/texas/Raildevide.gif (2153 bytes)

 The Green Train

The Engines

    The center pieces of the Railroad are the two engines, each of which has an extensive history of its own. Engine Number 1 is known as the Green Train due to its green paint scheme. The Green Train was constructed in 1901 as Engine 1280 of the Dickson Works of the  American Locomotive company.    

     Engine Number 2 is known as the Red Train for its red color scheme. It is the older and smaller of the two engines.  It was manufactured in 1897 as Engine Number 1754 of the Porter Company.

Enterprise Plantation

    Both Engines were originally built for the Enterprise Plantation, a Sugar Cane Plantation, in Patoutville, Iberia Parish, Louisiana, owned by the Patout family.  The Red Train was Enterprise's first engine and tender and was named the "Lydia". The Green Train was Enterprise's second engine and tender and was named the "Mary Ann".

    The Engines were part of a fleet of 8 engines and 220 4 ton cars eventually owned by the plantation railroad, which operated until 1945.

     The Engines are Narrow Gauge (36"), meaning that the distance between the two tracks is thirty-six inches. This is smaller than Standard Gauge Railroads, but allows for better maneuverability on tight tracks.          

    /sections/texas/txrrs0.jpg (41224 bytes)

     Both engines were leased to Six Flags Over Texas by the Patout Family when the park opened in 1961. As of 1995, the Trains still operated in the park under a lease agreement.

 

 

/sections/texas/railroad/Raildevide.gif (2153 bytes)Six Flags Rebuilds the Engines

 /sections/texas.TXgrntrn1.jpg (55323 bytes)

   The Green Train, originally the "Mary Ann" at the Enterprise Plantation, was renamed the "General Sam Houston" by Six Flags, in honor of the Texas hero. Its pulls four cars, and is the primary train of the railroad, operating even on slow days when only one of the two trains is running.

    The Red Train, originally the "Lydia" at the Enterprise Plantation, was renamed the "Maribeu B. Lamar", also in honor of the a Texas hero. It pulls a compliment of three passenger cars.  It usually runs as an extra train on crowded days.

    The two engines were rebuilt by the park at an estimated cost of $50,000 each. Photographs of the original "Lydia" and the "Mary Ann" hang in the lobby of the Texas Station.  Due to reconstruction of the engines, they look different from their current appearance and may not instantly be recognized. A lantern and cattle guard was added the front end of the each train. The Engines are no longer wood burning and the tenders were converted accordingly. Additional guide wheels were added to the front of each engine under the cattle guards.

    The front smoke stack on the Green Train was modified. On the Red Train, the covering for the Engineer and Fireman was moved back on the engine and additional windows were added.

    The passenger cars were also built for the park.

    The Red Train has since been renamed to the Charles Jefferson Patton, in honor of the engineer that operated the Six Flag engines for many years. The Green Train has been renamed in honor of Larry Cochran.

 /sections/texas/Raildevide.gif (2153 bytes)The Engine House

    The home to the Trains is an engine house built in the Southwest Corner of the park, outside of the Spanish and Mexican Sections. The Engine House can be viewed by Guests as they ride the trains.

 /sections/texas/txrrs2.jpg (25042 bytes)Train Operations - Sights  

    The Trains originally operated only out of the Six Flags Railroad Station in the Texas Section. The station was officially named the "Great Southwest Station." Trains left the Texas Station heading North towards the Chaparral cars. They made a non-stop round trip run around the park, which was completely enclosed  by the track. Along the way, riders could see some of the parks rides and attractions. Some of the route, however, was through as of yet undeveloped areas of the park. The park added sights to these areas. In what was to become the boomtown area of the park, Buffalo lived in pens for viewing by guests on the trains.

    The trains made their one way run until Six Flags added Boomtown in 1963. The Boomtown Station was added as part of the boomtown section and the trains began the tradition of stopping on the east end of the Park so riders could disembark and new riders could embark.

    When the StageCoach ride closed, the "Ghost-town saloon" animation was moved to become part of the train's landscape. Likewise, in 1968 when the Fiesta Train was rebuilt, the Train landscape became the home of several of the old Fiesta Train's animations, including the "dancing tamales". This section of the landscape became known as "Mexican Junction", although the Trains never actually stopped there.

 

Station Houses

    The ride stayed basically the same until Six Flags added Good Times Square in 1973. At that time, the old Boomtown Station house was removed and the Good Times Square Station was added in its place. Rather than being inside the track like the Texas and Boomtown Stations, the Good Times Square Station was on the outside of the track. The Passenger cars were modified accordingly so that they could be entered from either side.

  gtsrr1.jpg (50338 bytes)

  At the same time that the Good Times Square Station was added, the Trains were "turned" so that they ran the opposite direction, leaving the Texas Station South, heading towards the flume. Of course, the Conductors now how to learn to spiel "backwards".

    

    The Trains were "turned" again in the early 1980s, so that they now depart Texas in the same direction as they did in 1961, heading North, towards the Chaparral cars.

    In 1987, the Good Times Square Station was removed to make way for the Mr. Freeze Ride. At that time, a new Boomtown Station was built.

 txrrs3.jpg (25958 bytes)

    Texas Station has now been renamed from "Great Southwest Station" to the "Johnson Creek Station".

   The Six Flags Railroad is an official operating railroad regulated by the Texas Railroad Commission.

    An Official Texas Historical Plaque hangs on the outside of Texas Station, documenting the history of Narrow Gauge Railroads in Texas. The plaque, placed in 1966, incorrectly states that the engines were originally manufactured in 1887 and 1903.

 /sections/texas/txchap2.jpg (63083 bytes)

    The Trains remain a popular ride, in that they can be enjoyed by both the young and the old. More importantly, the preserve a piece of American history that many generations can only read about. Hopefully, the whistle of the engines will always be heard throughout the park.

 

(c) 1998 Davis McCown

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Railroad Spiel 1961

Railroad Spiel 1961 parktimes Sun, 09/19/2010 - 22:24

1961 OPENING SEASON
Updated Six Flags Railroad Spiel
Written by, Mr. Charles R. Meeker, Assisted by
James Thompson and Hulen Buckner
of the SFRR Crew.
Revised, August, 7,1961.
Provided by James Thompson

(While Train is unloading just before Bullpen Gates are open.)

Now loadin', boardin' and, filling up. This here Express Train is going to Buffalo Gulch, Scalpers Corners, Johnson's Creek, New Town, Rim Rock, Mexican Junction, Will's Point, and this here Great Southwest Station. All Aboard!

(As Train is loading.)

Well Howdy there you Folks, this here is yore Con-ductor (Brakeman) speakin' at you from back here on the backend of this bran new Express Train. We's just tickeled to death, to have y'all on here with us. But now before we git started they is a few rules you got to go by, a fore we can git started.

First is, there ain't suppose to be no stannin' up on this Train, cause when it starts off you might git knocked down, and hurt yoreself and besides the folks behind you couldn't see and they'll libel to git mad at ya! Also now, don't be sticking yore Arms, Legs, Feet, Heads, ner yore Younguns out of the Train cause they might git bumped or knocked off.

Then, don't be a throwin' no Sassparilly cups, Ice Cream Sticks, Lunch Baskets, Wives, Younguns, ner Mother n Laws off this Train neither, cause it messes up the Tracks, and we just might stop and make you git off and up pickum up.

Also, you gotta put out all yore Ciggeretts, Stogies, Charoots, and Seegars cause there ain't no Smokin' allowed on this Train. And for them of ya that might be a Chewin, be sure and don't SPIT cause yore libel ta git it all over you and the folks behind ya, and nobody would appreciate that.

Then finally, in case of an Indian Attack, I want all you Women and Childurn to git down underneath the Seats, and all you Men folk with yore Shootin Irons, and Six Guns ta git'im out and see if you can pick off a few of them critters.

Now we is just about ready to go, as soon as the Station Master down there gives the Signal, and the Engineer toots the Whistle. (Train usually will make a slight lurch forward, when this happens say.) Boy, did you feel that Power?

(As the front half of the Train clears the Water Tower start this.)

     The next Station is Buffalo Gulch. If you folks will look down there to your right you can see the Folks riding on the Butterfield Stage. Ya'all need to wave at them cause it's hot n dusty down there, and it'll take them 3 Days to get where there goin'. We're all most to the Station and if you will all look out under them Trees, you can see our Happy Family of Buffalo. There is the Momma, Poppa, a Baby, and the Big Ugly one over there is the Mothern Law.

(When the Engine starts across the 2nd Bridge.)

We're coming to Scalper's Corners. As I said, while ago. You fellas keep yore eyes peeled for any Injuns a hiding behind the Bushes here, and see if you can get a shot at one of them.

Page 2... (Revised 1961 Opening Season SFRR Spiel.)

(When back of Train clears the Scalper's Corners Station sign.)

Next Station, Johnson's Creek. Now folks when we start across this here next Bridge at Johnson Creek. I don't want to see nobody lean out too far and fall in, cause there is a couple a three, great big Snapping Turtles, and a bunch of Water Moxkins down in there, and we don't allow ya'all to feed them.

(As Engine clears the far end of Johnson Creek Bridge.)

     Folks we'll be coming in to "New Town" Station in a minuet . Now I want you all to look up here on you right at the folks riding these new fangled con-traptions. Me and the other fellas working on this Train, was a looking at them the other Day and, we figured it wasn't too smart of them to be riding on them things. Cause as you can see, as far down in them things as they are, and as fast as they are a going, if the bottom was to fall out of it. They'ed wear the Seat of their Britches out before they could get it stopped!.

Now if you think that was funny looking, I want you to look at this thing down her next to the "New Town" Station. See there, they got these boxes with wheels on them running around on that little biddy track. Now who in the world would want to be on something like that when it's a jerking and banging you around like that. They got some pretty funny looking stuff over here in this part of the Country.

(As Engine crosses RR Crossing just past "New Town" station.)

"Rim Rock" station is right down here, and we'er fixing to go thru the Tunnel. So I want all you Women and Childurn to git out yore Hankies and kivver up yore Faces, so you don't choke on the Coal Smoke. (After Con-ductor clears Tunnel.) Now, didn'

(When Train gets about 2 way up the grade past the Tunnel, Call next station!)

     "Mexican Junction" Now folks if'un you'll look right out there to your right, in a minuet you can probably see the Little Mexican Train that you can connect with if you wuz to get off this Train here. But you can't git off, cause we ain't stopping, cause nobody told me you wanted off.

 

     Next Station is "Will's Point". Now when we git down here, I want you to look down thar among them Trees and you can probably see them Folks riding on then Mules with one of them Con-cestidoor fellas a looking for one of them Cities of Gold.

(After Engine passes "Will's Point" Station Sign, Station Master at Great Southwest Station will Signal a STOP with the White Flag. Engineer will answer with the Train Whistle, say.)

Now Folks we're fixing to come in to "Great Southwest" Station and we'll be a stopping cause the Station Master there has Signaled us to stop. Now I don't want see nobody to start to git up and git off til the Train comes to a complete stop, and I tell you it's alright to git off. Cause If'un you wuz to git off to quick, you might fall down and Skin yore knees, Scuff yore Boots, Rip the Seat of yore Britches, or Dent up the Platform, or no tellin what, and we can't have that, so just keep yore Seat. Now just hold it, wait a minuet, Hold it. (Train stops with slight jerk. Then say.) Ok, Now you can git off, and Ya'

Railroad Spiel 1974

Railroad Spiel 1974 parktimes Sun, 09/19/2010 - 22:12

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Railroad Spiel as Given
SFOT - 1974

(written in dialect)

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Great Southwest Texas Depot
(Leaving for Good Times Square)

We-e-e-ll, howdy there folks. This here is yore corn-ductor speakin' at cha'll frum th' very tail end of this here brand spankin', spiffy new, luxurious, stre-e-e-m lined, an' air corn-ditioned 1897 (for General Sam Houston,)/ 1901 (for Maribeau B. Lamar) narry-gauge railroad train.

Yessiree, you folks is in fer th' time of yore life. But just so as it won't be th' last time, there are a few important company policies you to be abidin' by. First off, don't you go to a standin' up, jumpin' up and down, playin' tag, flyin' kites out the winders, runnin' up an' down th' runnin' boards, er a playing musical chairs. Second of all, I don't want to see none of y'all throwin' off you paper cups, ice cream sticks, brothers, sisters, or mother-in-laws, causin' ifin' you don't want them, well neither do we. And I don't want to see no smoking of any sort aboard this here train, cause the engine up front will be doing enough for the all of us, I ga-a-a-ranteee.

Now in just a second that corn-ducter down there on the platform is goin' to be givin' the signal an' we're going be pullin' outa here. Y'all see that there corn-ductor? Well, she's mighty fine at givin' that there signal. Yessireee, she went to school for three week learnin' ta signal thata way. Ain't that somethin'? Well, don't you be too impressed, 'cause it was only a two day course.

Well there was the signal, and here we go, [engine usually makes one big pull before] and there we went [and then comes to a near stop.] [While the train is barely moving]. Why if you don't believe that were a really movin', just look behind us. See?, we are a leavin' tracks.

[Train leaves the station heading south, towards the flume.]

As well pull out of the station, I want you to look to your immediate left. There you will see the Six Flags Watermelon patch. If you ever go a get a whole in your watermelon, that's were you can take it to get a patch.

../spain/spflume1_small.jpg (4387 bytes)Also off to yore left is the original, genuine, first in the country, Six Flags Over Texas Log Flume Ride. Yessiree, those folks have the time of their life floating around in that there giant horse trough. An' if you think that Horse trough is big, wait'll you see the size of the horse that a drinks out of it.

[Flume ride to the left in the trees.]

Yessireee, I hear that is one might fine ride, 'cept at the end. They tell me it's a real let down.

Off to yore left is a long green building. That's our En-jun house. That is where we put our engines to bed at night. But don't ch'all corn-fuse the Engine House with a teepee or a wigwam, ya hear?

Next stop is Me-e-e-x-i-i-can Junction! Here's where ya'll can join in the singin' and the dancin' an' th' wild Bull-fightin'. If ya'll cast yore peppers up there to yer left an way up in th' sky ya'll see a real live volcano. An' I bet if we was ta stay here long enough we'd get ta see a mighty molten mass move down th' mountain hotter than the sun!../mexico/mxftrn1_small.jpg (3461 bytes)

The weather forecast for this here junction is "chilly today' and "hot tomalle".

[On the right and left are dancing tamales, and Mexican men riding very small horses. All left over animations from the Mexican hat train.]

These here are our Dogwood trees. Do ya know why we calls 'em Dogwoods? 'cause of their bark.

All you ladies best look off to th' right, 'cause on yore left my friend Zeke is goin' be out takin' his monthly showery bath. I'm shore he'd be a might embarrassed if you was to watch 'im. Well for shame for shame own you, lady!

[Hillbilly in a shower barrel taking his shower.]

Every year we get hundreds of thousan's of letters complimenting us on our beautiful landscaping. You may be a wondering whats we call these beautiful plants a growing to your left and your right. We calls 'em weeds.

An' now look up there ta your right. To the sky, to your right, Do ya see it? Do ya see it? Of course ya don't see it. There's nuthin' up there to see.

[Nothing to see in the sky.]

Cover up ya noses now, 'cause shoe-oe-oe-oe-weeeee we're coming to a tunnel. Don't that smell sweet as fried bacon on a Sunday mornin'' at th' farm. That smell so sweet, we wus thinkin' of bottlin' it up an' selling' it as a fancy perfume. We wus gonna call it "Tun-nel" number five.

 

../modern/bigbend/MDbigbend_small.JPG (13599 bytes)Now everyone, look to your left and to your right, you see that there thing swerving around that track, that's there is the big bend roller coaster.

Yes sireee, those there trains go around that there a swevin' a curvin' track faster than Ewell Gibbons chasin' after a wild hickory nut!

(If the B.B. is broken down: Do ya see them trains runnin' up and down the' swervin'' an' curvin' track? Do ya see 'em? Of course ya don't, 'cause them trains move so fast they can't be seen!)

[Big Bend cue house to the left of the train. Track to the left and around the train. Ewell Gibbons was a popular health food/nature sponsor of the time.]

Now looky off to yore left, seem them things sputterin' around th' road bed? Thems called automobiles. But don't you go and learn that fuelish word, cause those thangs won't never replace the horse an' buggy. Why, there built so fast and so low to th' ground, you'd burn th' seat of your britches off if ya ever did tried to stop one.../modern/happy/happy1_small.jpg (4447 bytes)

[Happy Motoring off to the left.]

Off to the right is a Great Big Ol' Yella Buildin'. Do ya know what we call that there Great big ol' yella Buildin'. That's right - we calls it the Great Big Ol' Yella Buildin'! Actually, that there's the Sid an' Marty Krofft Puppet Show. And we have a real fine show there, no strings attached.

[Puppet show off to the right.]

In just a minute we'll pull into the Good Time Square Station an' all of ya'll' that wants to get off kin get off when we get ta a complete stop an' after I tell you to. You folks that wanta stay on are more than welcome to do that to.

Like I said, now, wait a minute, just a second! Hold it now… just a cotton pickin', finger licken', ever lovin' ever lastin'. I say "1", ("pause") I say "2" … I say "2", I say "2". Well I done said to three times now, so Get Off.

Good Times Square Station

Howdy folks. (pause) I sed "Howdy" (pause) Howdy! (pause) I gives ya'll a great big Texas Howdy and all I get back is a little ole Rhode Island "hi". I sed "Howdy". Well, ain't ya'll a trainful of Minnie Pearlz.

Th’ Six Flags Over Texas Narry Gage Railroad Company is proud ta announce th’ imminite departure of th’ General Sam Houston/Mirabeau B. Lamar on track #1, which is th’ only track we got, non-stop for the Great Southwest Texas Depot.

Soasta we kin get from here ta yonder just like we got frum yonder ta here, I'm gonna give y'all a few important compuny policies. First off, don't ya be standin' up, er jumpin' up an' down, er be actin' wild, wolley, weird, wicker er way-out. An' don't nobody be smokin' nuthin', 'cause the engine up front just might get excited, an' just might get ignited. Don't ya be a throwin off your ice ream sticks, an' paper cups. An' last of all, don't ya be danglin' yer arms and legs off the train, "cause if ya stick out off fer a little too long, you may bring 'em back in a little too short.

Of course, th' most important rule is that nobody is ta be turnin' around an looking at yer handsome, good-lookin', swave, debonair, personable, modest, intelligent, resourceful, charmin' cornuductor at th' very tail end of this train. (pause) What's th' matter Lady, ain't you never seen a corn-ductor before?

Well, now just as soon as that there corn-ductor down on th' platform gives th' engineers th' signal, we'll be pullin' outa here.

(Signal) Well there's th' signal. Here we go, an' there we went. Did you feel that blinding burst of speed? Yessireee, why, we’re a moving faster than a whole heard of man-eating mud turtles, a slipping and a sliding down to the creek on a salty Saturday in September.

As we leave, I want you to be sure and waive good-bye to that there conductor on the platform, cause if you don't waive goodbye, he won't a know that were a leavin'.

../frontgate/btmgr1sm.jpg (7896 bytes)Lookee of there ta your left an' y'all see th' Six Flags over Texas Carousel Ride. That's a fancy name for a merry-go-round. There's one identical to this one at th' Smithsonian Institute.

[Passing the Merry-go-Round on the left.]

That there track yore a seeing now is th' Six Flags Mini-mine train. We built it 'specially fer all ya little folks an' all you big chicken's whats to scare to be a ridin' on th' Six Flags Over Texas Runaway Mine Train. It's guaranteed ta jar, jive, jump an' jolt you socks off with its mighty trestle, mighty track, and might mine trains.btmine1sm.jpg (7043 bytes)

 

To your right is th' Ghost Town Saloon. Y'all can see my friends are still playing' the poker game they started last Thursday. You may be a thinkin' that they is on a crash diet. That's not it at all, its just that the bartender has been forgettin' ta put the olives in there drinks.

 

caddo1sm.jpg (9458 bytes)Iffin' everyone will lookee ta yer left, y'all see th' Caddo Indians in their canoes. Little is it known that them canoes are faster than th' U.S. Mail. That's cause not only do they have an injun in th' front, they had an injun in the rear. By th' way I'll bet cha'll don't know why th' Indians were th' first folks on th' American Continent? It's cause they had reservations!

Iffin y'all will cast yer peepers to yore right, you'll see th' scariest ride at Six Flags Over Texas. We call it th' Dallas-Fort Worth Turnpike. (Now we call it I-30).

Now if you'll look there ta yer left, you'll see a cement pond where we corral our dolphins. Yessirree, we was gonna have George C. Scott teach us a dolphin how to talk, but Larry Zonka couldn't make it.

[At the time, George C. Scott had released a movie about teaching a dolphin to talk and Larry Zonka played for the Miami Dolphins.]

That great big ol' orange thang next to th' dolphin pool is th' worlds tallest land-based oil derrick. Yessireee, we got elevators there that'll take ya 300 feet into the sky, an' bring ya back down 320. Course, if ya don't want to go all the way to th' top, ya kin walk up them steps an' slide down on one of th' longest slides in this part of th' country.taapesm.jpg (2990 bytes)

Inside that funny locking building there to yer left is where ya kin see the Chevy Show. The Chevy Show is a real fine show. You had better see it before you leave the park tonight, 'cause it's awfully hard ta see it after ya leave.

Off to your right is our Music Meal Theater.

../texas/chaps/txchap2_small.jpg (4380 bytes)To your left is the horseless carriages produced by the Chaparral Motor Car Company of Cleburne, Texas. In 1911 them thangs was selling better than buttered biscuits at th' State Fair, but Henry Ford came along and put 'em out of business, cause Ford had "a better idea".

In just another minute were gonna pull into th' Great Southwest Texas Depot an' when we do you folks that want ta get off can get off, and you people that want to stay on can stay on. But ya can't do both, an' ya can't do neither either, so you best make up your mind.

It'll be just another second, just another minute, hold it, wait, wait till I give you the word. Hey there Mister, will you pleas pull your big, fat, hairy leg back into th' train? Oh! Sorry about that Lady!

Now hold it, wait… Let me give you th' word, hold it, wait…. Word. I sed, "WORD". "WORD" Well, I done said the word three times, what are you a waitin' fer? Get off. This here train don't go no slower.

Chaparral Antique Cars

Chaparral Antique Cars parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 10:43
Parksections
Texas
Year installed
1962
Final Season
Operating

The Chaparral Antique Car ride is the second oldest continuously operating ride in the park, surpassed in age only by the Six Flags Railroad. The ride was first open in the park's second season, 1962. The ride is known as "Chaps" to the employees and "the old timey cars" to the guest. It consists of a fleet of small gas power automobiles which are "driven" around a peaceful track by the guests. While the steering wheels and gas pedals are operational, a runner in the middle of the track keeps the cars from being driven outside the boundaries of the road.

     The ride was initially themed on the Chaparral Motoring Company of Cleburne, Texas, which produced Automobiles introduced in 1911. For years a sign inside the Chaps queue house documented the story of the automotive company. (The sign has since been removed.)

 

txchaps6.jpg (37579 bytes)          The ride was modeled after the Happy Motoring Freeway, which was essentially the same ride with more modern car bodies. Happy Motoring was opened in the first season and a second track was added in 1962 when the Chaparral ride was open. In contrast to the Chaparral cars, the Happy Motoring cars where know as the "Modern" cars by the Guests. From 1962 until Happy One was closed in 1980, the park operated three motoring tracks. (One Happy Motoring track was removed in 1980, the other in 1986).

     The ride is located in the Texas station, near the Texas Railroad station, and for years sat in a peaceful location, far from the noise of any thrill rides or noisy attractions. Now it is in the shadow of the Texas Giant

     When the ride opened, there were twenty-two cars. Little has change on the ride over the years. The Que house and garage are essentially the same as they were in 1962. Some of the attractions visible from the track have changed, but little on the track itself is different. One change that comes and goes is the removal of the car's tops. In the early 1970's the tops were removed, making the cars convertibles (see below picture). The tops were restored and have recently again been removed and the cars are now "convertibles".

Photo Gallery

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Chaparral horseless Carriages, Probably 1961.
Note the Uniforms of the Employees and the name Chaparral on the Grill.
The Cars were probably just turned for the picture.

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Chaparral cars, Late 60's, early 70s

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Chaparral Cars, around 1974.

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Chaps Que House - 1985.

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Chap cars - 1985.

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Chap Queue-house and cars as they appear today.

Tags

The Gunfighters

The Gunfighters
Section
Texas
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:09

The Gunfighter Shows have been held in the Texas section since the park opened in 1961. The shows recreate the good-guy/bad-guy shoot-outs of the wild west. They are designed to be entertaining more than historically accurate. Typically they take place on the street in front of the Courthouse in the Texas Section.  Over the years, however, shows have been held in various locations around the park. In some shows, outlaws rob the Train while it is running, leading to a shoot-out in front of the Texas train station.  Shoot-outs have also been held in front of the Jersey Lilly, around the corner from the Courthouse.  

Starting in 1994, the Texas section hosted the Texas Backlot Stunt Show, an outdoor action-comedy stunt-show featured in the Texas section. Additional sets were built next to the Jersey Lilly for this show. The first show, the O.K Corral Shootout Backlot show, was tied to the release of the Warner Brother’s movie Wyatt Earp. The stunt shows continued through the 1990s.

At this time, the Gunfights continue in front of the Courthouse. 

 

Gunfights in front to the Texas Courthouse. From Six Flags Postcard. Note Judge Roy bean on the porch with a "hanging rope". Also note the park photographer with a Polaroid Camera in the Mid-left of the photograph. The photographers sold the Polaroid pictures to guests.

Gunfighters in front of the Texas Astrolift. The Texas Railroad station would be out of the photograph to the photographers left. The area in the upper left corner of the photograph is now the location of the Boot Scootin' Ride.  

Texas Giant

Texas Giant
Section
Texas
Year installed
1990
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:14

Texas Giant Roller Coaster

      On opening day, March 17, 1990, Six Flags opened the Texas Giant Rollercoaster, at the time, the world's tallest wooden roller coaster. The Giant, Six Flags second wooden roller coaster, is located on 2.9 acres of the park in the Texas section, across the railroad tracks from the Texas Railroad station.

     The trains travel up an initial lift of 143 feet, followed by a 53 degree drop of 137 feet. The trains travel the 4,920 feet of track in a little over two minutes. They average speeds of up to 39 mph and the riders feel g-forces of up to 2.7.

     The three trains carry up to 28 guests for a capacity 1,800 riders per hour. The trains were built by the Philadelphia Toboggan Company. The track was designed by Curtis D. Summers and built by the Dinn Corporation.

      The ride closed on November 1, 2009, for a yearlong renovation, to reopen in the 2011 season. Being more than just a rebuild, it is anticipated that the new version will have alternate elements.

 

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The Titan

The Titan
Section
Texas
Year installed
2001
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:17
Last Season Operated
Operating

 

2001 -

     The Titan was built for Six Flag's fortieth anniversary season. Construction of the Titan was one of the Six Flags over Texas' largest capital expenses.  The ride, a” mega-coaster”, is located in the southwest corner of the park, west of the Texas section, in an area that had previously been outside the park.  Much of the ride extends out over one of the park’s parking lots.

     The ride starts with a 245 foot high hill. The lift leads to a 255 foot 65 degree drop into a 120 foot long below ground tunnel. After topping the first hill, the ride reaches speeds of up to 85 mph. The ride track is 5,312 feet in length. The three thirty rider trains can carry up to1600 guests per hour. During the three minute ride, guests can experience up to 4.5 Gs.

     The Titan is an extended version of the Goliath built at Six Flags Magic Mountain. When built, the two rides tied for the third tallest roller coaster in the world. Since then they have dropped to fifth tallest. The pair are currently the sixth fastest steel coasters in the world. Both rides were built by Giovanola of Switzerland.

Section

Crazy Horse Saloon

Crazy Horse Saloon
Section
Texas
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:12
Last Season Operated
Operating

Crazy Horse Saloon Theater

     The Crazy Horse is show saloon, complete with a small stage for western singing and can-can dancing, as well as a bar. In keeping with the park’s family friendly atmosphere, park promotional materials make it very clear that “although it is a saloon, only soft-drinks are sold there.”

    The theater is rather small, with room for a small stage, a piano, and several tables for the guests. Four or five performers in saloon costumes sang period songs, danced on the stage and mingled with the guests.

     In keeping with the park’s historical emphasis, the entire back bar is an actual antique bar from an 1890 vintage saloon. Carpenters crafted a new front bar to conform to the original. Antique tables and chairs were acquired from a saloon in Little Rock, Arkansas.

     While there are shows and performers in all of the sections of the park, the Crazy Horse is unique in that is the park’s first indoor show. It continued as the park’s only indoor show for the first seven years of operation, until the much larger Southern Palace replaced the amphitheater in 1968. It is also the longest running theater in the park, operating continuously since the first season. Inside, the singing and dancing showgirls still entertain visitors.

    Being the only indoor theater, the Crazy Horse also served as an employee auditorium, being used for orientation sessions, training, and other meetings

    The Crazy Horse Saloon opened with the Park in 1961 and is the oldest theater in the park.

 

   

 

    Below is a shot from the 1966 show courtesy of LaVerne Huselton Catter.

Section

Spanish Section

Spanish Section parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:57

Spain

    The Spanish section recreates the three hundred years between 1915 and 1821 that Texas was part of the Spanish Empire.

    The Spanish section has always been rather small. The Spanish section originally consisted solely of the Los Conquistadores mule ride. The entrance to the ride consisted of a replica of the Mission San Francisco de Los Tejas, the first mission built in Texas by the Spaniards.

    In 1962, the Casa Magnetica house was added next to the mule ride.

    In 1963, the El Aserradero (Log Flume Ride) replaced the mule ride.  In 1968, a second log flume was added next to the first.

    In 1981, the Spanish Conquistador was added in a part of the part which had traditionally been the Mexican Section, overlapping the two sections.

 

Spanish Attractions

Burro Ride

The Flume Ride Article

Casa Magnatica Article with Spiel

The Conquistador

spflumeII_small.jpg (3157 bytes)

 

Burro Ride

Burro Ride
Section
Spain
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 16:58
Last Season Operated
1962

Burro Ride

1961 - 1962

spburro.jpg (29897 bytes)

    The Burro ride was a live animal ride which operated for the park's first two seasons at what is now the site of the Log Flume Ride. For its short existence, the ride was basically the only attraction for the park's Spanish section.

    The premises of the ride was that the guest were following in the shadow of Spanish conquistador Francisco Vasquez de Coronado. The journey consisted of a mule-back descent into Palo Duro Canyon in a search for the seven cities of Cibola. The trip was guided by a host dressed as a Spanish conquistador.

    Along the way, the guest viewed the restored ruins of the first Spanish Mission to Texas, the Mission San Francisco de los Tejas.

    The attraction was removed at the end of the 1962 season to make way for the Log Flume ride.

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Casa Magnetica

Casa Magnetica
Section
Spain
Year installed
1962
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 17:06
Last Season Operated
Not operating

     Casa Magnetica is one of the oldest remaining attractions in the park. It is known as the "crooked house" by many guests. It first opened in 1962, for the park's second season. At one point in the 1980's it was rethemed as a different attraction. It was, however, soon returned to the "Crooked House".

     The principal of the house is simple, being built at an extreme angle creates an optical illusion that items are rolling uphill.  The entire attraction is built around this one simple illusion.

     This is a walking tour in which a host or hostess guides the guest through the house, explaining its history and demonstrating its anti-gravity effects.

      The spiel, as it was given in 1977, as well as pictures follow,

Casa Magnetica Spiel - 1977

Downstairs -

     Buenos Dias (Good Morning) - Buenos Tarez (good afternoon) - Buenos Nochez (good evening) amigos, and welcome to Casa Magnetica. You are about to see the strangest house ever built by a man.   Don Juan of Madrid, an inventor of sorts, decided that his home was just like everyone else's and he wanted this place to be a little different.  I think you'll agree he succeeded once you see the magnetic house.  Up seems down and down seems up ...even mother nature seems to be a little confused about this place.  So, be careful to watch your step and just follow this pathway.... (open gate)

First Room ---

     You are now leaning in the first, and smaller, room of Don Juan's Casa Magnetica.  Don Juan built his house with convenience in mind, and he believed too much of life is spent in the trivial matters of day-to-day existence, such as house cleaning.  To help solve this problem, Don Juan invented this unique broom.  Each day he would sweep out his house, and then simply let go of the broom.  As you can see, it will stand wherever you leave it, a timesaving device indeed.  

     Having included many such devices in his house, Don Juan suddenly found himself with a large amount of free time on his hands.   Refusing to be idle, he took up the art of painting.  Don Juan was a great inventor, but unfortunately not a great painter.  In fact, he paint so slow, that the fresh fruit he often used as art subjects spoiled before he finished his paintings.   In such cases, he would place the spoiled fruit on this table, and as you can see, it rolled up the table, out the window, down the mountain, never to bother Dan Juan again.   (Walk to chain and shake it)  And now, if you will kindly stagger into the next room, there is much more for you to see.

sphouse.jpg (38658 bytes)Second Room--

     Case Magnetica has been well preserved by Six Flags.  You are now standing in Don Juan's dining room, just as it was many hundreds of years ago when he lived here himself.  Continuing his policy of building a house of ease, Don Juan felt it necessary to have a simple way to get breakfast.  Thus, he created this unique system, whereby the simple touch a lever, fruit is delivered right to your hand.  (Start the oranges rolling up the trough when you say "Continuing his policy...") 

     For all his greatness, Don Juan had one fault, he was eccentric.  Living in the wilderness made food both scarce and hard to get.   Because of this, Don Juan disliked dinner guests who were always stopping by.   Applying all his inventive talents to the problem, he came up with an answer, this table.  Should a guest happened by at meal time, and ask for, say, an orange, Don Juan would sit them on the far site of the table, and then roll one down. As you can see, the guest seldom got what he ask for, but soon got the idea, and never returned, for fear of starvation........

     Now mi amigos, it is time to say "adios". We hope you are enjoying your visit at Six Flags and we hope that you come to visit Casa Magnetica again.

     Hasta la vista.

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Section

Log Flume Ride

Log Flume Ride
Section
Spain
Year installed
1963
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 17:01

     "El Aserradero", or the sawmill in English, was the official name for the Flume Ride when it first opened in 1963. The name refers to the building housing the first lift, which is designed to replicate a log saw mill. Employees generally refer to the ride as the "Flume Ride" and guest simply  call it the "Log Ride".

    The Log Flume Ride is tied with the Carousel Ride as the fourth oldest attraction in the park. They are surpassed only by the Railroad, the Chaparral cars and  Casa Magnetica. It is actually been operated more seasons than either the  Carousel or  Casa Magentica, in that both have been closed at various times for more than one season.

 [Click on Pictures to view larger versions]

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The ride is simple in concept. Guest float around a large "flume" in small fiberglass boats designed to look like wooden logs. The ride starts with a trip up the "low lift"or "lift 1". A pump under the lift raises the water to the height of the flume at the bottom of the lift. The logs are carried up the lift on a conveyor belt, then drop down the slide into the flume, which at the bottom of the "low lift" is higher than the rest of the ride.

    The "logs" then float around the curving flume, carried forward by the the water, which is actually traveling slightly downhill. The ride reaches the bottom of "the high lift" or "lift 2". The water at the base of this lift is the lowest level of the ride. The logs travel up another conveyor belt and then drop down a much higher slide to the end of the ride. The final drop creates the splashing effect for which the ride is famous.
 spflume1.jpg (39634 bytes)

    Flume rides are now an amusement park staple and are common at amusement parks across the nation. The Log Flume ride is, however, a unique Six Flags' creation. The Six Flags Log ride is the first log ride in the world. It was also the first ride in the park that did not have a Disney counterpart.

    The ride was constructed by Arrow Development, which originally built rides for Disneyland. Six Flags over Texas was the first park to receive Arrow rides outside of Disneyland. Arrow also built the  Happy Motoring and Chaparral Cars and would later build the  Runway Mine Train.

spflft1.jpg (38537 bytes)

The ride replaced the burro ride, which had been located in the same location.  The flume, as with the burro ride before it, together with  Casa are all that consisted of the Spanish section.

  

 

    

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The ride is reminiscent of older "shoot the chute" rides at parks and fairs. In this rides, small boats floated down a large slide onto a large pond or pool.

Luna Park - Coney Island - Shoot the Chutes

 

Flume II spfl2bk.jpg (35451 bytes)       

    The Log Ride proved so popular that Six Flags added a second flume in 1968, five years after the first. The second flume, Flume II, is essentially the same as Flume I, and is generally operated only on high capacity days.

    

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    The ride has changed little over the years. During the 70s, the ride was  enhanced by several animations.  Lumberjacks could be seen in the woods sawing logs. A large villain character stood on top of the Flume One Mill house sawing on a large log. The log created the appearance that any minute it would break off and fall on any riders beneath it.  He had a constant repetitive laugh that got very old for the employees working the ride.

    His counter-part was a large "Paul Bunyon" type lumber jack that stood atop of the low lift of Flume II. He swung a large axe back and forth at the logs as the rode underneath of him.

    Also for a time, the drop on Flume II was covered, creating a tunnel through which the riders dropped.

spfldp.jpg (27483 bytes)    At one time billed by the park as "the most popular and exciting ride ever  devised."  The ride is now overshadowed by the larger water rides, such as Splash Down Falls and LaSalle's Rapid Adventure.

    Ride capacity at each flume is approximately 1,000 per hour.

spfldr.jpg (60753 bytes)

Conquestador

Conquestador parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 17:08

Conquistador, the Flying Ship of Spain

For the park’s twenty-fifth anniversary, the Conquistador, the Flying Ship of Spain was introduced. While technically themed as a Spanish attraction, and situated near the exit to Flume II, the ride was physically located within what had before always been the Mexican section. This placement created a blurring of the sections to the extent that they are sometimes referred to as if they were one section. The ride is a traditional swinging ship ride in which the riders sit facing the center of the boat. The ride is suspended from a structure so that it can swing back and forth like a pendulum. The ride slowly starts to rock back and forth, until it reaches the point where it seems as if it will go completely upside down. As that point, each time the ride reaches the top of either point, the riders experience a moment of weightlessness while the ride changes directions.

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Mexico Section

Mexico Section
Section
Mexico
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 17:28
Last Season Operated

Operating

Mexico

MXFLAG.JPG (3418 bytes)   Mexico

    The Mexican Section represents Texas during the years between 1821 and 1836, when it was a part of the Republic of Mexico. The entrance to the Mexican section was marked by the Banderas de Colores, the colorful canopied gardens, which lead to the section from the front gate. 

    

The main attraction in the original Mexican Section was the Fiesta Train. For the small children, there was a goat-cart ride. The Mexican Market provided shopping and an El Chico restaurant provided food. 

     The Indian Village entrance was behind the Indian Trading Post, which was on the border of the Mexican and Texas sections.

    For the second season, (1962), the Sidewinder cat and mouse roller coaster was moved to Mexico and renamed the La Cucaracha.

      In 1963, the Goat-cart ride was removed, and more shopping areas were added to the market place.  

  

After the 1964 season, both the La Cucaracha and the Indian Village were removed and the El Sombrero Hat Ride was added at the former site of the La Cucaracha for the 1965 season.  The El Sombrero Hat Ride was later moved to the other side of the Mexican section.

    In 1968, a remodeled Fiesta Train replaced the ride's original train and animations. The remodeled ride remained until the 1978 season, after which it was removed.

    At the end of the 1979 season, the Banderas de Colores (Covered walkway) was removed.

    In 1981, the Spanish Conquistador was added in the middle of the Mexican section, blurring the distinction between the Mexican and Spanish sections.

    In 1986 the Avalanche BobSled Ride was added at the former site of the Fiesta Train. The Avalanche was later renamed as the The La Vibora  Ride.

Section

Ferrocarril Fiesta Train

Ferrocarril Fiesta Train
Section
Mexico
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 17:10
Last Season Operated
1978

Ferrocarril Fiesta Train

1961 - 1978

     The Ferrocarril Fiesta Train was the type of ride that defined the early years of Six Flags. Located in the Mexican Section, the well themed and colorful ride was enjoyed by everyone, from the very young, to the very old. It opened with the park in 1961, and entertained guests until it was removed after the 1978 season.

      The ride consisted of two diesel-powered narrow gauge trains which carried guest through a series of light-hearted animations themed to a colorful Mexico. One of the trains was named "El Cho Cho", the other "El Cha Cha." The original passenger cars had large sombreros for tops, earning the ride the nickname, "The Hat Train."

      Like the larger Six Flags Railroad, the Fiesta Train was a narrow gauge railroad.

     The two railroad trains consisted of nine little square cars, each of which seat four adults. All were painted in bright pastel colors. For a roof, each of the cars had a giant colorfully painted sombrero, leading to the ride eventually being called the “Hat Train” and the “sombrero train”.

     The engines slightly resembled street cars, with a rectangular structure. The ride was an outdoor “pretzel” style ride; that is a ride whose track curves in and out several times, like a giant pretzel. This allows different isolated scenes to be observed by the riders, without being distracted by the next or last scene.

     The trains pull away from the small station to loudly playing Mexican music. Around the first bend riders viewed an animated band of Mexican musicians, dressed in white with large sombreros, constantly playing their pleasant tunes. The train turned another bend and riders spotted a troop of dancing tamales, as tall as people, each also wearing a large sombrero. The tamales constantly spinned as they dance to another gleeful song.

      Around the next bend was a more comical scene, a group of oversized travelers, sitting on much too small burros, rocking back and forth as they head to some unknown destination. They too wore large colorfully sombreros.

     When the ride was redecorated in 1968, the dancing Tamales and oversized burro riders were moved to the railroad ride, where they are now seen from the train ride.

     The next bend revealed a sleepy little village, where characters in large sombreros took their siesta in the afternoon sun. Another scene was the “Gardens of Xochimilcho”, with its picturesque scenery, a small pond, with a fountain and small boat. Another mariachi band performed at the gardens.

     The final scene was a bull fighting arena, the Plaza De Los Toros, where a matador challenges a large black bull, while a crowd wearing large sombreros cheers him on. As the bull moves through its paces, it appears for a moment that it is charging the train, leaving the riders with a little fright. The trains then pulled back into the station to end the ride.

     For the 1968 season, the trains and animations were completely redesigned by Sid & Monty Krofft. The engines were redesigned as dragons and the trademark sombreros were replaced with more traditional cars. The central component of the remodeled ride was a Volcano which dominated the section's landscape. A small stream of "lava" flowed down the volcano, which "erupted" every few minutes with a loud "boom".

While still a family ride, the graceful scenes were replaced with more exciting ones. Mexican children, singing the ride's trademark "Fiesta" song, danced at the station. A "run-away bus" served as the remodeled rides first animation.

    The train entered into the volcano and exited in the middle of a Mexican town. A gun battle was taking place in the town, and the train passed through the middle of it. Peaking from one window was Batman and Robin, foreshadowing their later more major role in the park. The shoot-out scene in Bugs Bunny's Gold River adventure is very reminiscent of this scene.

    The ride ended with a trip through a circus, in which numerous animated characters performed various feats to loud music.

    The La Vibora Ride,(originally, the Avalanche Bobsled), is now located in the general area in which the trains ran.

 

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Dancing Tamelas

  

"Bull Fighter"

 

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     Artist Concept of Ride

Indian Village

Indian Village
Section
Texas
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 17:21
Last Season Operated
1967

The Indian Village

Although the Native Americans did not have a flag to be recognized in the park’s theme, they did play an important role in the development of Texas. As such, an area representing their contribution was appropriate.

The Indian Trading Post and Village is not contained within a single section, but rather sets on the border between the Mexican and Texas sections. The front of the Indian village is the trading post. The Trading Post is a large souvenir shop selling Western and Indian related items.

Behind the trading post was the Indian village. A set of four tee-pees sat in the corners of a small square blacktop performance area. Here Native Americas performed authentic hoop dances during the day.  Typically, two Native American’s perform the Hoop dance with wooden hoops, not unlike a hula hoop. A third slowly marks time on an Indian tom-tom.

The Indian trading post still sits at is original location. The Indian village, however, has been removed.

mxiv1.jpg (25514 bytes)

 

 

 

mxiv1.jpg (25514 bytes)

Section

Sidewinder Roller Coaster

Sidewinder Roller Coaster parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 10:55
Parksections
Mexico
Year installed
1961
Final Season
1964

Sidewinder Rollercoaster

1961 - 1964

One Rollercoaster - Two Names

The Sidewinder has the distinction of being the first roller coaster at Six Flags. It was also the only roller coaster in the park for the first four years of operations.

The ride, a “Cat and Mouse”, style metal roller coaster consisted of individual units, each of which could hold one or two riders. As with most coasters, the cars were pulled up a lift hill. Instead of traveling down a straight fast and steep drop, however, they descended down a winding track with sharp turns. The wheels were set back to the rear of the unit, so that as the car approaches a curve, the front end sticks out over the edge of the track before the car started turning. This design creates the illusion that the cars are constantly about to run off of the track.

The ride only operated as the “Sidewinder” for first season. For the 1962 season, it became the first ride in the park to be moved to a second location as it was relocated to the Mexican Section a and renamed the “La Cucaracha”.

The ride was manufactured by Herschell Company under the name of the Mad Mouse.


The "Sidewinder" in the Modern Section - 1961
Future Site of Happy Motoring Track II


Sidewinder - 1961 - Modern Section

mxcat1.jpg (66378 bytes)
La Cucaracha in the Mexican Section

Tags

Mexican Hat Ride

Mexican Hat Ride
Section
Mexico
Year installed
1965
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 17:20
Last Season Operated
Operating

El Sombrero - The Hat Ride

    The El Sombrero, or the "Hat Ride" as it is known, was first opened in the park in 1965. This makes it the seventh oldest operating ride in the park. Most likely manufactured by Chance Rides, the Hat is a generic carnival ride, often know as the Wagon Wheel, the Tabrant, or the Chaos. The ride is designed to look like a giant Mexican Sombrero. The riders sit is a circle of two adult seats which constitute the rim of the hat.

mxhat1.jpg (42257 bytes)

    The ride begins by spinning around on an off-center axis. As the ride picks up speed, an arm raises the ride in to the air at approximately a 45 degree angle. These leave the riders spinning in all directions, around the circle of the hat, up and down at the angle of the arm, and around the platform.

    The ride was originally installed at the site of the short lived La Cucaracha Roller Coaster, in an area next to the current location of the Silver Star Carrousel. It was later moved to its current location near the The La Vibora (Avalanche Bobslide) Ride.

    The ride is currently painted with a yellow base. Earlier, the ride was painted blue.

(c) Davis McCown, 1998

Section

Goat Cart Ride

Goat Cart Ride
Section
Mexico
Year installed
1961
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 17:15
Last Season Operated
1963

The Goat Carts were authentic goat carts, small wooden carts in which two or three small children sat in the cart as it is pulled around a dirt path by a goat. The path was boarded by a small wooden fence to keep the goats from wondering off. An attendant walked along with the cart and keeps the goat moving. The Goat Carts were short lived and were removed from the park at the end of the 1963 season, after three years in the park.

Section

La Fiesta De Las Tazas, Tea Cups

La Fiesta De Las Tazas, Tea Cups
Section
History
Year installed
2006
parktimes Thu, 07/07/2016 - 20:11

Added with the ten new rides for 2006 was the La Fiesta De Las Tazas, which roughly translates to the "Party of the Cups". This teacup ride was added in the Mexican section. The ride is Manufactured by Zamperla and is located near the La Vibora Bobsled, the queue house used for the ride was previously used by the Fiesta Train and then by the Sombrero. 

The teacups are mounted on in groups of three on small circular areas. The circles rotate as a larger platform rotates. In addition, the riders can turn a wheel inside the cups, so they rotate as wheel. Each teacup can hold up to five riders. Hourly capacity for the ride is 1,200 guests, with a ride length of one minute and thirty seconds.

 

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Section

Boomtown

Boomtown
Section
Boomtown
Year installed
1963
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 20:37
Last Season Operated

Operating

    Boomtown was the first section added to the park after it opened. It opened in 1963 in the far northeast corner of the park.  Boomtown was themed as a typical Texas oil field town during the oil boom of the 1890's and 1900's.

    The Boomtown station house opened with Boomtown, allowing the   Six Flags Railroad to begin dropping passengers off on the far side of the park. Prior to opening of Boomtown, the Railroad ran nonstop round trips only.

    The   Six Flags Carousel and the   Sky Hook were other original boomtown attraction. 

    In 1964, the  Caddo War Canoes were moved from the Confederacy to Boomtown.

    In 1966, the park's first major roller coaster, the   Runaway Mine Train was added in the boomtown section.

    At the end of the 1968 session, the Sky Hook was removed.  The   Mini Mine Train opened the next season, in approximately the same location.

    In 1972, a   Miniature Six Flags Model opened in the Texas Travel Exhibit. At the end of that season, the Boomtown station was removed and replaced with the Good Times Square Station on the opposite side of the tracks. The model was removed in the late 70's or early 80's.

    At the end of the 1982 season, the  Caddo War Canoes were removed from the park.

    At the end of the 1985 season, the  Merry Go Round was removed for reconstruction.  When it returned, it was placed at the Front Gate.

    In 1989, the  Texas Tornado Swing Ride was moved to old site of the Carousel.

    In 1997, a new Boomtown Station replaced the Good Times Square Station.

Section

Sky Hook

Sky Hook
Section
Boomtown
Year installed
1963
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 20:43
Last Season Operated
1968

The Sky Hook

1963 - 1968

    The main attraction of the original Boomtown was the 190 foot tall Sky Crane Ride. This unique ride was actually adapted from a cargo crane. The ride units consisted of two metal teardrop shaped baskets, each of which could hold 14 guests. Each was attached to a cable at the end of one of the structure’s “Y” shaped girder arms. 

     After loading, the basket was lifted up into the air. Midway up the height of the structure, the basket stopped and the entire structure rotated 180 degrees. While in that position, the basket rose again, to a total of 155 feet in the air. As the basket rose into the air, the basket on the other arm descended to be unloaded. While the other basket was unloaded and reloaded, guests in the first basket enjoyed a panoramic view of the park below them.

      Once the other basket was loaded, it ascended halfway up as the first basket descended. At the half way point, the baskets again rotated, so that the original basket could descend to the dock and be unloaded while the guests in the second basket could enjoy the view.

     Strictly speaking, the ride was not “themed”  to anything in particular in the boomtown section. It was, however, a unique experience and provided a view of the park unmatched by any ride to that date. It also provided a visual identity for the park from the freeway and surrounding area until 1968 when it was removed and replaced by the Oil Derrick as the park’s high ride.

     The ride itself had quite a history, having first thrilled attendees at the Brussels’ world’s fair of 1958. From there it came to Texas. After being removed from Six Flags Over Texas in 1968, the ride was dismantled and moved to Six Flags Over Georgia, where it stood as that park’s major focal point until it was sold to Magic Springs amusement park in Arkansas, where it operated for several years. It was later converted to a bungee jump platform.

During a major remodeling of the Arkansas park it was dismantled and sold for scrap metal.

bthook.jpg (50002 bytes)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caddo Indian Canoes

Caddo Indian Canoes
Section
Boomtown
Year installed
1962
parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 22:07
Last Season Operated
1983

The Caddo were an Indian tribe native to Texas. Much in the style of the original rides, this ride recreated a ride on an “Indian War Canoe”.

The five long canoes sat approximately sixteen guests, on benches of two adults each. They were steadied and steered by an employee, dressed in Indianan costumes, at the back of the canoe. On some occasions, an “Indian” employee sat at front of the canoe as well.

In addition to actually steering the canoe, the employee would often entertain the guests with instructions on how to paddle, as well as jokes and antidotes about the park and sights.

Much to the surprise of many of the guests, who frequently believed that the ride had some type of hidden motors or tracks, the canoes has no method of propulsion other than their paddling. In addition, the canoes were not on any type of track or guide. In fact, the Indians often encouraged their guests to race any other canoe in the area back to the dock. The canoes traveled around a small pond named “Caddo Lake”

In the middle of the water was a small island, named “Caddo Island.” The canoes traveled completely around the small island which contained a small Indian village, complete with teepees. The original loading dock for the ride was at the end of a long path that traveled between the Amphitheater and Skull Island River.

The Canoes were removed from the park at the end of the 1983 season.

The Caddo War Canoes

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Runaway Mine Train

Runaway Mine Train
Section
Boomtown
Year installed
1965
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 21:08

     The Six Flags Run-A-Way Mine Train was installed in 1966, and is the eighth oldest operating attraction in the park.

    Although the Mine Train is the oldest of the park's current fleet of roller coasters, it was not the first coaster in the park. The first coaster was a cat and mouse style metal coaster in the Modern section originally named the Sidewinder. The Sidewinder opened with the park in 1961. In 1962 it was moved to the Mexican section and renamed the La Cucaracha. The La Cucaracha was removed from the park at the end of the 1964 season and before the Mine Train was installed in 1966.

Que House

  

Que House

 

Que House

    The Mine Train was, however, the first of its type anywhere in the world. It was developed for the park by Arrow Dynamics, a California company that also built happy cars and the flume.  The coaster ride was based on technology first developed by Arrow for the Disney Matterhorn.  Although metal roller coasters were not at the time novel, the Mine Train used nylon wheels and tubular steel pipe track rails for a smoother faster ride. This development paved the way for future metal coasters.

    The ride originally cost $1 million to build.

Que House

    As is true with the earlier rides in the park's history, the ride is well themed. The que-house is designed to look like a mountain mine building. The cars are themed to resemble mine ore cars. Animations along the ride gave the feeling of the times.

    The ride consists of 2,484 feet of track broken between three lifts, the highest of which is 35 feet. The three lifts and que-house brake the ride into four zones, allowing the use of up to five trains. One train can be at or between the loading zone and the first lift, another between the first and second lift, another between the second and third lifts, another between the third lift and the unloading zone and the last in the unloading zone. The lifts can be stopped at anytime to maintain the train separation.  

Que House

      

        The ride begins with the trip up the first and highest lift. From there it travels around the track to the second lift. The second lift is housed in a building designed to look like a rock crusher. Looking straight up as you travel through the second lift reveals a large crusher rolling above you. From the second lift, the train travels slowly "through a waterfall" allowing the guest to see the waterfall from the inside.  

Que House

    An animated scene of miners can be seen panning for gold in the water in front of the waterfall. The train then picks up speed as it heads downhill and through a man-made "mine" tunnel.

 

 

Que House

    The train emerges from the tunnel and travels up the third and final lift into the "Ace Hotel and Saloon". The "Ace Hotel" was named in 1974 for John (Ace) Cocharo, a Mine Train Foreman turned ride supervisor. The train travels through the hotel, allowing riders to see the "piano player" and hotel guests. The ride then descends the last drop into a tunnel which actually travels "under" the Caddo lake, emerging just outside of the que-house.

Que House

    The top speed of the ride is billed at 38 feet per second, which translates to twenty-six (26) miles an hour.

 

 

 

    In 1996 the Run-a-way Mine Train name was changed to just the "Mine Train" to avoid confusion with the newly constructed "Runaway Mountain" in the Confederate Section.

Que House

 

    A very successful high capacity ride, the Mine Train was copied in theme parks around the nation. The ride is now a piece of history, and is still a favorite with the crowds.

Que HouseMine Train from the Air

(c) Davis McCown, 1998  

Mini-Mine Train

Mini-Mine Train
Section
Boomtown
Year installed
1969
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 21:11
Last Season Operated
Operating

    The Mini-Mine Train was built in 1969, making it tied with the Tower for the 9th oldest operating ride in the park.  (Both have been out of operation for a season for remodeling.)

     The ride was built by Arrow Development, the same company that built the Runaway Mine Train.     Located next to the original "Runaway Mine Train", the Mini-Mine train was specifically designed to be a roller coaster for the younger crowd.  The lift hill is twenty (20) feet high.

    The train goes around a basically circular track and back to the que house.  On slow days, to make the ride a little longer, the trains are run twice for each ride.

    The track was rebuilt in 1997 to accommodate the New Mr. Freeze ride.

 

Mini Mine Train

Shot of the new "Mini-Mine Train."

(c) Davis McCown, 1999

Section

Miniture Texas Model

Miniture Texas Model
Section
Boomtown
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 21:24

Texas Travel Exhibit

 

 

 

bttravel1.jpg (70877 bytes)

Tower Section

Tower Section parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 19:31

Oil Derrick

Oil Derrick
Section
Tower
Year installed
1969
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 19:34

      The Tower is a 300 foot tall observation tower shaped like an oil derrick. It first opened for the 1969 Season and is the park's ninth oldest operating ride. It is billed as "the world's largest land based oil derrick", but of course it can not function as an actual oil tower.   The Tower is the tallest structure in the park.

     The ride was built by Intamin. It was constructed in an area that was a part of Skull Island which contained the Pirate Ship and cave. It replaced the Crane Ride in the Boomtown section as the park's observation ride. The Crane Ride was closed at the end of the 1968 season.

tower   

tower

   Two high speed elevators take riders to the tower's two observation platforms. From there the entire park can be viewed. On a clear day, guests can see all the way to Dallas on the East and Fort Worth on the West. Arlington is to the South and the mid-cities to the North. Telescopes are also available for a quarter for close up viewing.

    A railing wraps around the tower at the 100 foot level. This railing is nonfunctional, however, and only provides "balance." There is no platform at this level.

tower

 

    The top of the structure is 300 feet high; the highest guest platform is 267 feet high and 50 feet wide; the lower guest platform is at 255 feet and is 45 feet wide; the "fake" railing is at approximately 100 feet; the old slide level, which can function as a lower observation deck serviced by stairs, is at 47 feet and is 75 feet wide; the base level is 74 feet wide.

        Originally the tower had a twelve lane slide attached to the fifty foot platform. The slides traveled off the East side of the tower, towards the area that is now the roaring rapids. The slide was removed in 1976. The platform and railing are still visible at that level.

tower

     In the 1980s, the shoulder high railing system was supplemented with a mesh fencing which caged in the entire observations deck.

    The entire elevator system was rebuilt and closed for the 1998 season.

     At Halloween, the Tower is decorated with a Giant Ape. At Christmas, the Tower is decorated with a star. In the 1998 season, the Ape sprung a hole and had to be taken down.

    The Tower has sister towers at Kings Island in Ohio and Kings Dominion in Virginia. Although the other Towers are shaped to look like the Efle Tower, they are both dimensionally almost identical to the Texas Tower.

Views
tower

 

tower

 

tower

 

(c) Davis McCown

Tower Slide

Tower Slide
Section
Tower
Year installed
1969
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 22:22
Last Season Operated
1975

taslide.jpg (41216 bytes)

Related Lists

Skeeball Palace

Skeeball Palace
Section
Tower
Year installed
1974
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 23:10

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Related Lists

Music Mill

Music Mill parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 13:35

1974 - Current

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Shockwave

Shockwave
Section
Tower
Year installed
1978
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 22:24

       The Shockwave features an initial 116 foot lift, followed by a 36 degree drop into the two seventy foot loops. The one minute, fifty-eight second ride travels through 3,500 feet of track. The trains travel at up to 60 mph, with banks up to sixty degrees while the riders pull up to 5.9 g’s. Three trains of seven cars each can hold up to 28 riders. The ride capacity is 1,800 an hour.

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Roaring Rapids

Roaring Rapids parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 14:01

Roaring Rapids

    

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    When it opened in 1983 the Roaring Rapids raft ride was the largest, most expensive ride ever constructed at the park. The raft ride, designed to simulate the experience of white water rafting on a raging river, is  located just south of the Tower and physically takes up more space than any other ride in the park. 

frraft.jpg (44053 bytes)

     The ride replaced both Skull Island and LaSalle's Riverboat Adventure, which were removed after the 1983 season to accommodate the new ride. Construction actually began August 16th, 1982, the day after the Riverboat made it last trip.

    Originally, the entrance to the ride was on the north side of the ride, directly across from the exit area for the Tower.  Later, the ride was renamed as LaSalle's Rapid ride and the entrance was moved to the south side of the ride, in the same location as the former entrance to the LaSalle's Riverboat ride.

rapids5.jpg (38163 bytes)

    The ride was designed by Six Flags and built by Intamin A.G. at an estimated cost of $4.2 million dollars. (Intamin A.G. also built the Shockwave, Tower, and Spinnaker.) 

    The concept for the ride was inspired by the man-made river used for the kayak races in the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. The first ride of this design was built by Six Flags for the Six Flags Astroworld park and opened in 1980.    

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    The ride constitutes of three lakes and four stretches of rapids. It is 80 feet across at its widest point and 16 feet wide at its narrowest.  The "river" is filed with 1.5 million gallons of water and is powered by two 400 horsepower pumps which pump 150,000 gallons of water per minute. These are supplemented by five water jets.

    The ride's reservoir is capable of holding 2 million gallons.

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    With an average water speed of 16.6 feet per second, the river grade drops 14 feet from start to finish. The 1/4 mile ride takes about 2 minutes to complete.

    The ride is equipped with 20 twelve passenger boats and can carry approximately 1,200 riders per hour.

    As of 1983, all six of the theme parks then owned by Six Flags operated a ride of this nature.  Today, virtually ever major amusement park has a similar ride.

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Cowboy Stunt Show

Cowboy Stunt Show
Section
Tower
Year installed
1991
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 23:07
Last Season Operated
1991

The Hollywood Stunt Show was staged during 1991 at the Tower Theater, where it replaced the Dolphin Show. The show featured trained stuntmen performing various action scenes. There was little change in the theater for the new show. The pool itself was covered to create a large performance area, with a western town facade added at the back.

The Hollywood Stunt Show was produced by Benros Worldwide Entertainment and was staged for one year. Benros later produced Gunfight After the OK Corral and Bad Day at the Backlot stunt shows in the Texas section of the park.

In 1992, the show was replaced by the Batman Stunt Show. 

In addition to producing shows in numerous other parks, Benros staged the Colossus show for Freedomland in 1961.

During the show, one character entered the arena using a zip line mounted on the fifty foot platform of the tower.

 

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Air Racer

Air Racer
Section
Tower
Year installed
1984
parktimes Sun, 08/22/2010 - 14:46
Last Season Operated
1999

     The Great Air Racer was a high swing ride installed for the 1984 season. The ride units were shaped to look like barn-storming bi-planes. Each plane was designed to hold six, with three seats, each holding two adult riders.

     After the twelve planes were loaded, a structure rose up the middle of a large tower structure. The planes, each connected to cables, rose in the air with the structure. As the planes rose, they began to spin around the tower. Eventually, the force of the spinning planes forced them to spin further and further from the tower.

     At their highest, they were nearly 100 feet off of the ground. The plans reached a spin rate of 36 miles per hour. After a few minutes of spinning, the rotation slowed and the planes began their descent back to the tarmac below them.

     The ride was installed by Intamin and cost two million dollars. A sister ride was built at the Six Flags over Georgia park.

      It was removed after the 1999 season.

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Section

Go Carts

Go Carts
Section
Tower
Year installed
1999
parktimes Sat, 08/21/2010 - 13:32
Last Season Operated
Operating

A go-cart track was added for the 1999 season between the railroad tracks and the Shockwave. Riders race traditional go-carts around the winding track. The track sports forty go-carts, twenty-four of which have individual seating and sixteen of which have dual seating. Only twenty carts run on the track at any one time. Track races last four to six minutes.  

The track and carts cost the park $500,000. Premier Parks installed similar tracks at nine of its 25 parks. There is a $5 up-charge to race the carts.

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Superman, The Ride

Superman, The Ride
Section
Tower
Year installed
2003
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 20:32
Last Season Operated
Operating

The park opened the Superman tower ride for 2003. The ride, a three leg free-fall tower, stands 325-feet tall from the ground to the top of the ten-foot tall US flag mounted on the structure. It is one of the world’s tallest free falls rides. At the time that it was installed, it was the tallest structure in the park when measured to the top of the American flag.

Built by S&S Power, Inc. of Logan, Utah, each one of the three legs has three sides. Each of the three sides holds three seats, for a total of twenty-seven simultaneous riders. The ride has a capacity of 1,200 riders per hour.

The ride seats are propelled by compressed air. Riders feel 3.5 g’s on the ascent and a negative .8 g’s on the descent. The cost of construction was estimated at over $10 million dollars.

The Superman Tower of Power was previewed with a media event on Wednesday, March 23rd, 2003. The ride officially opened to the public the following Saturday. Twelve contest winners were the initial riders for the ride’s official opening. Named for Superman, the hero of comic books, TV shows, and movies, the ride followed the park’s practice of naming rides after DC Comic characters.

 

Top of Superman TowerSuperman Ride

 

Section

Goodtime Square

Goodtime Square parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 23:30

Good Times Square

 

Good Times Square

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Goodtimes Square Articles:

Goodtime Square Games

Goodtime Square Games
Section
GTS
Year installed
1973
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 23:16

GoodTimes Square Games

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Crazy Legs

Crazy Legs
Section
GTS
Year installed
1973
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 23:23
Last Season Operated
1982

Crazy Legs (Original)

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Rotoridiculious

Rotoridiculious
Section
GTS
Year installed
1975
parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 20:30
Last Season Operated
1988

RotoRidiculious

     The Rotoriculous was built at the back of Good Times Square between the Bumper Cars and the Crazy Legs. The Rodoriculous was designed from a typical “Himalaya” style ride, with a chain of seats strung together to form a circle around the edge of the ride.

     The Rotoriculous differed from other “Himalaya” style rides, however, in that it was completely indoors. It was housed in a small building with just enough room for the ride and control station. In addition to the ride, the room was equipped with special audio and visual effects, including the symbol of the seventies, a large disco mirror ball.

     As the ride started, the cars moved up and down and they circled the track. As the ride slowly started forward, a recorded narration began, telling the story of the invention (the ride) and its intended purpose.

     Within a few moments, however, the narrator announced that something had gone wrong, as which time the ride began to rotate backwards at much greater speed. Simultaneously with the ride changing directions, the sound became more chaotic, random slides were flashed at high speeds on the sides of the building, and other flashing lights went off.

      Eventually, things were brought back to “normal”, the ride slowed down and the bizarre lights and sounds terminated. As the years past, the narrator was removed and the slides and lights became more random. Eventually, the ride was renamed the Roto-disco and the disco ball became the centerpiece effect.

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Texas Chute-out

Texas Chute-out
Section
GTS
Year installed
1976
parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:00
Last Season Operated
2012

     America’s Bicentennial year was a year of major celebration throughout the Country. It was also the year that Six Flags celebrated its 15th anniversary. New for the Bicentennial year was the “Texas Chute Out”, the world’s first “modern” parachute drop ride. The ride was built by Intamin AG, in Berne, Switzerland, at a cost of $1.5 million.

    The ride was located to the east of the Good Times Theater. The 200 foot tall tube structure had twelve forty foot arms extending from the top of the structure in an 85 foot diameter. Cables on each arm pulled a small bench seat up to 175 feet above the ground. The ride then stoped for a brief moment, long enough to give the rider a bird eye’s view of the surrounding areas. The ride then released the bench, allowing the ride to follow free fall thirty-five feet towards the ground below.

     In seconds, however, the ride’s thirteen and a half foot diameter parachute engages above the rider, allowing the rider to “float” down another one hundred and forty feet to the surface. The ride was driven by twelve motors and winches located at the top of the ride. These controlled the 2 and ½ miles of steel cable used by the ride. Access to the motors was through a two man elevator located inside the eight foot tube structure. Each ride lasted 28 seconds.

     The design capacity for the ride was 1,500 riders per hour. Two to three rides could ride at a time. Built by Intamin AG, the ride was known as the “first modern” parachute ride due to the fact that it was based on similar earlier rides. The most famous of the earlier rides include one built for the 1939 New York’s World’s Fair and moved to Coney Island in 1941, where it operated until 1968.

     A similar ride, the Great Gasp was constructed at Six Flags Over Georgia in 1976. It closed and was demolished in 2005. A third sister ride, the, Sky Chuter opened at Six Flags Over Mid-America in 1978 and closed a mere four years later, in 1982. 

      The Texas Chute-out operated for thirty-seven seasons. It was closed in 2012. It operated in the park for more seasons than any other ride which has been removed. 

 

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Judge Roy Scream

Judge Roy Scream
Section
GTS
Year installed
1980
parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 20:33
Last Season Operated
Operating

       For Six Flags twentieth season a traditional wooden roller coaster, the Judge Roy Scream “Awe West of the Pecos”, was installed next to entry Lake on property south of Good Times Square. This property had previously been totally outside of the park proper.

       To create the Judge Roy Scream the park hired William “Bill” Cobb, a man who had practically a legend in his own time and his firm William Cobb & Associates.

     Since the ride is outside of what had always been the park proper, it is only accessible through a tunnel which travels under the park’s entry driveway. The eight acre ride runs parallel to the large lake located outside the front gate. It was billed as the “biggest addition” in the park’s history.

     The ride handles two trains of four cars each, for a total of 24 riders per train. The trains travel up to 53 mph. The ride’s main lift is 65 feet, with a 50 degree, 60 foot drop. The trains travel a total of 2500 feet of track in approximately two minutes. The ride is designed to handle 1,200 passengers an hour.

       For a time in 1994, some variety was created by turning the trains around, allowing the riders to ride backwards as they traveled around the track.

      While not as large as its sister “scream” coasters at Georgia and Mid-America, the Judge Roy Scream is highly popular and brought the park’s operating coaster count to five.

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Flashback Roller Coaster

Flashback Roller Coaster
Section
GTS
Year installed
1989
parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 20:35
Last Season Operated
2012

Flashback

      The Flashback is a boom-a-rang style rollercoaster built by the Vekoma Ride Company of the Netherlands. The boomerang is a standard Vekoma style roller coaster, which are quite popular in amusement parks across the country due to their large number of elements squeezed into a small footprint ride.

      The ride starts with the sole train being pulled backwards out of the stationhouse up a steep one hundred and twenty five foot incline. Once at the top, the train is released, where it travels back through the stationhouse, into a loop, through a roll, into a second loop, through a third loop and up another one hundred and twenty-five foot incline of the same size as the first.

      The track is designed so that it brings the track back around to a position next to the original track. The train is then pulled to the top of the second lift and released, where the ride repeats the track, this time with the riders traveling backwards.

      The train travels up to 50 mph. The ride turns the riders upside down a total of six times in the one minute, fifty second ride. The single train holds up to 28 riders, with seven four person cars, for a capacity of 750 riders an hour.

The ride was removed at the end of the 2012 season to make room for the Texas SkyScreamer.

 

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Bumper Cars

Bumper Cars
Section
GTS
Year installed
1973
parktimes Sun, 08/15/2010 - 23:21
Last Season Operated
2007

 

The Goodtime Square Section opened in 1973. Included with the new section was the Infernal Electric Bumping Machines, a traditional bumper car ride. The fifty cars were powered by electricity running through the roof of the building and reaching the cars through a rod on the back of each vehicle. 

The ride was no longer operated after 2007, although the ride building was not removed from the park for several years. The Catwoman's Whip is now located in the area of the bumper cars. 

 

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Gotham City

Gotham City parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:04

Batman Roller Coaster

Batman Roller Coaster
Section
Gotham City
Year installed
1999
parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:07
Last Season Operated
Operating

Batman the Ride

       In 1999 Six Flags continued its DC Comics theming with the introduction of Batman The Ride, the park’s 10th roller coaster.  An entire themed area, Gotham City was added to accommodate the ride. Two acres consists of the Gotham City Park. Several games stands, as well as the Mr. Freeze, are located in the new section.

       The Batman is the park’s only suspended roller coaster, with the cars riding suspended below the track. In addition to being suspended, the ride is floorless, so that the rider’s legs hangs suspended below the cars, with nothing under them but the grounds.

       The ride, built by Bollinger & Mabillard of Switzerland. contains 2,700 feet of track. Featured ride elements include a 77 foot tall vertical loop, a 68 foot tall vertical loop, two 40 feet tall corkscrew spirals, “s” curves, flat spins and a zero gravity heartline spin. The ride features two 52 (32) passenger trains, with riders suspended four across.

        The ride reaches 52 mph, with a height of 109 feet. Riders feel up to 4 g’s. Designed capacity is 1,400 riders an hour. The ride is one of eight installed in various Six Flags parks.

 

 

Mr. Freeze the Ride

Mr. Freeze the Ride
Section
Gotham City
Year installed
1998
parktimes Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:11
Last Season Operated
Operating

Mr. Freeze Roller Coaster 

      The Mr. Freeze Roller Coaster was built in 1997, but did not open until 1998, bringing the Roller Coaster count to eight. Named for the Mr. Freeze villain from the Batman universe, the queue house was built to resemble a decaying factory, with a huge ice cream man head for the entrance.

     The Mr. Freeze Roller Coaster varies from traditional roller coasters in that it does not have a lift to pull the trains to a starting point. Instead, the ride uses rare earth magnets located in the station house and alongside the train body, to “push” the train out of the station.

      The trains then travel through a series of elements, including an inversion, ending in a section of track which leads straight up. Near the middle of this section, another set of rare earth magnets shots the trains again, until the trains nearly reach the top of the track, giving the riders the impression that it the train will shot straight off the track. As the train travels up the track, it slowly losses power, until it comes to a complete momentary stop. The train the starts to fall backward, at which time, the train repeats the track backwards.

The trains were reversed in 2012, so that the trains leave the station backwards and repeat the track going forward. At that time the ride was renamed "Mr. Freeze, Reverse Blast". 

The ride was built by Premier Rides of Maryland.

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The Riddler Revenge

The Riddler Revenge
Section
Gotham City
Year installed
2016
parktimes Mon, 07/04/2016 - 00:21

The Riddler Revenge is one of three Villain rides in the Gotham City section.

The ride is a swinging disk that travels 147 feet into the air. The disk swings back and forth while it spins counter-clockwise. The ride structure is 90 feet tall. At its highest, the disk swings out 120 degrees, 30 degrees above perpendicular to the ground. The disk obtains speeds of up to 70 mph. The ride seats 40 riders.

 

Que House

 

Que House

 

Que House

 

Que House

Catwoman Whip

Catwoman Whip
Section
Gotham City
Year installed
2016
parktimes Mon, 07/04/2016 - 11:23
Last Season Operated
Operating

The Catwomen Whip is one of three villain rides in Gotham City. It was installed in 2016. 

The ride is 65.6 feet in diameter. It is 13 feet tall when not operating and 68.5 feet when fully elevated. It rotates at 14 rpm, with a maximum acceleration of 3 gs.

Zamperla manufacturers the ride.

The ride holds 48 guests in suspended seats mounted on a circular structure. The ride starts by spinning around.  As it does the seats wing out sideways from the structure. The ride structure then starts to rise up perpendicular to the ground, in the style of a Ferris Wheel. As it does, the units continue to spin around it, turning completely upside down as it spins. After a few moments, the ride slows and returns to its starting point.

The ride is similar to the "Enterprise" style ride Spinnaker, which was previously in the park. The Spinnanker, however, used enclosed gondolas for ride units and not suspended seats.

 

Que House

 

Que House

 

Section

Batwing

Batwing
Section
Gotham City
Year installed
2006
parktimes Mon, 07/04/2016 - 16:02

The Batwing is an airplane carousel ride. Riders ride in fourteen small two seat "batplanes" around a base. Each plane as a flight stick to allow the riders to raise and lower the plane as the ride runs. The planes rotate at six rpm for a ride time of one minute and forty-five second.  Around 700 riders can ride an hour. 

The ride is a Telecombat style ride from Zamperla. The Batwing units are customized for Six Flags.

Que House

 

Section

Harley Quinn Spinsanity

Harley Quinn Spinsanity
Section
Gotham City
Year installed
2006
parktimes Mon, 07/04/2016 - 13:11
Last Season Operated
Operating

Harley Quinn Spinsanity (originally the Crazy Legs) is one of the three villain rides in Gotham City. It is a Trokia style centrifugal force ride manufactured by HUSS Park Attractions.

The ride has three arms that each hold seven ride gondolas. When the ride is running, the arms travel around in a circle, as well as up and down at an angle up to 40-degrees. The units reach a height of thirty feet. As the ride arms rotate, the vehicles spin around the end of each arm. Each gondola holds two guests, for a total of forty-two riders. When run with two minute rides, the hourly capacity is estimated at 900 riders.

The ride was previously installed as the Warp 2000 at Astroworld. It was transferred to Arlington after Astroworld closed in 2005 and was part of the ten new rides opened in 2006. At that time it was named the "Crazy Legs". It was renamed the Harley Quinn Spinsanity in 2016 as part of Villain Village in Gotham City.

Another ride named the Crazy Legs operated in the park from 1973 to 1982 at a nearby location. This ride is similar to the original Crazy Legs ride. The original ride was, however, a different type of ride.

 

Que House

 

Que House

 

Que House

 

Que House

Section

The Joker

The Joker
Section
Gotham City
Year installed
2017
parktimes Sat, 02/25/2017 - 23:37

Pre-opening pictures of the Joker, to open in 2017.

 

Que House

Joker Roller Coaster Sign.

Que House

Joker Track under construction, February 2017.

Que House

Joker Seats waiting to be installed.

 

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